Event Title

Regulation of an Earthworm Eisenia fetida and the Regulation of its Nephridal Bacteria

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

21-4-2014 10:00 AM

End Date

21-4-2014 11:30 AM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Dorothy Wrigley

Mentor's Email Address

dorothy.wrigley@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Regulation of an Earthworm Eisenia fetida and the Regulation of its’ Nephridal Bacteria Jeremy Balster Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine two mechanisms the earthworm Esienia fetida might use to regulate its’ symbiotic bacterium Verminephrobacter. Verminephrobacter resides in the nephridium of the earthworm which is an osmoregulatory organ. The first possible way of regulation is through the extrusion. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was the main assay used to mark the bacteria and a fluorescent microscope was used to detect the bacteria. When earthworms are shocked coelomic fluid is extruded through pores. The fluid and bacterial cells were collected and stained with a specific DNA probe for the symbiont and examined with a fluorescent microscope. The other possible way is through the earthworms’ phagocytic cells. Some of the phagocytic cells are also extruded after shock. To test whether the bacteria were phagocytized, the symbionts are mixed with coelomic cells. Then interactions with the coelomic cells were examined using both gram staining and the FISH technique. Finally, for viability, the bacteria mixed with coelomic cells were plated and compared to bacteria numbers without coelomic cells. Results are still underway and will be presented.

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Apr 21st, 10:00 AM Apr 21st, 11:30 AM

Regulation of an Earthworm Eisenia fetida and the Regulation of its Nephridal Bacteria

CSU Ballroom

Regulation of an Earthworm Eisenia fetida and the Regulation of its’ Nephridal Bacteria Jeremy Balster Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine two mechanisms the earthworm Esienia fetida might use to regulate its’ symbiotic bacterium Verminephrobacter. Verminephrobacter resides in the nephridium of the earthworm which is an osmoregulatory organ. The first possible way of regulation is through the extrusion. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was the main assay used to mark the bacteria and a fluorescent microscope was used to detect the bacteria. When earthworms are shocked coelomic fluid is extruded through pores. The fluid and bacterial cells were collected and stained with a specific DNA probe for the symbiont and examined with a fluorescent microscope. The other possible way is through the earthworms’ phagocytic cells. Some of the phagocytic cells are also extruded after shock. To test whether the bacteria were phagocytized, the symbionts are mixed with coelomic cells. Then interactions with the coelomic cells were examined using both gram staining and the FISH technique. Finally, for viability, the bacteria mixed with coelomic cells were plated and compared to bacteria numbers without coelomic cells. Results are still underway and will be presented.

Recommended Citation

Balster, Jeremy. "Regulation of an Earthworm Eisenia fetida and the Regulation of its Nephridal Bacteria." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 21, 2014.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2014/poster_session_A/2