Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

21-4-2014 10:00 AM

End Date

21-4-2014 11:30 AM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Michael Bentley

Mentor's Email Address

michael.bentley@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

The element rubidium is known to have similar biological impact as K+ ions and some studies have shown that heart tissue takes up rubidium through K+ channels and Na+/K+ ATPase pumps. The purpose of the research was to confirm whether or not rubidium was transported into individual cardiomyocytes. Rubidium may be used as a marker to study different physiological functions of K+ and its channels and pumps. The methods used are mainly two parts: isolation of single heart cells and treatment with rubidium. Isolated heart cells were obtained by anesthetizing a rat, extracting the heart, and infusing its aorta with cell isolation buffer (CIB) solution, and then a digestive enzyme solution containing collagenase, trypsin, and protease. The heart was cut into small pieces to further separate individual cells at 37°C. Once the cardiomyocytes were isolated, they were treated with Tyrode solution containing a physiological concentration of rubidium chloride. Cells were freeze dried and examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy System (EDS) to determine the amount of rubidium that was taken up by the cells. It is expected that there will be an uptake of rubidium cardiomyocytes by means of Na+/K+ ATPase pumps and K+ channels like K+. These ATPase pumps are essential in creation of concentration gradient and membrane potentials in most cells and K+ has many critical roles from muscle contraction to regulation of nerve conduction and propagation in heart cells.

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Apr 21st, 10:00 AM Apr 21st, 11:30 AM

Rubidium Uptake in Isolated Rat Cardiomyocytes

CSU Ballroom

The element rubidium is known to have similar biological impact as K+ ions and some studies have shown that heart tissue takes up rubidium through K+ channels and Na+/K+ ATPase pumps. The purpose of the research was to confirm whether or not rubidium was transported into individual cardiomyocytes. Rubidium may be used as a marker to study different physiological functions of K+ and its channels and pumps. The methods used are mainly two parts: isolation of single heart cells and treatment with rubidium. Isolated heart cells were obtained by anesthetizing a rat, extracting the heart, and infusing its aorta with cell isolation buffer (CIB) solution, and then a digestive enzyme solution containing collagenase, trypsin, and protease. The heart was cut into small pieces to further separate individual cells at 37°C. Once the cardiomyocytes were isolated, they were treated with Tyrode solution containing a physiological concentration of rubidium chloride. Cells were freeze dried and examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy System (EDS) to determine the amount of rubidium that was taken up by the cells. It is expected that there will be an uptake of rubidium cardiomyocytes by means of Na+/K+ ATPase pumps and K+ channels like K+. These ATPase pumps are essential in creation of concentration gradient and membrane potentials in most cells and K+ has many critical roles from muscle contraction to regulation of nerve conduction and propagation in heart cells.

Recommended Citation

Lee, Jooyoung; Jaekook Sim; and Karleen Doering. "Rubidium Uptake in Isolated Rat Cardiomyocytes." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 21, 2014.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2014/poster_session_A/21

 

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