Event Title

Analyzing the Effects of Isovaleraldehyde and Cuminaldehyde on DNA

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

21-4-2014 10:00 AM

End Date

21-4-2014 11:30 AM

Student's Major

Chemistry and Geology

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Danae Quirk Dorr

Mentor's Email Address

danae.quirk-dorr@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Chemistry and Geology

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Second Mentor's Name

Mary Hadley

Second Mentor's Email Address

mary.hadley@mnsu.edu

Second Mentor's Department

Chemistry and Geology

Second Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Normal cells in the human body grow, divide, and die uniformly. If the normal cell’s DNA gets damaged, the cell will either repair it or die. Cancerous cells are cells that continue to grow instead of dying, so when a cancerous cell’s DNA is damaged the DNA will not be repaired, nor will it die off. The cancerous cell will continue to replicate the damaged DNA. This research involves the possible reaction of isovaleraldehyde and cuminaldehyde with DNA. This could cause damage to the cell’s DNA, and possibly lead to cancer. Isovaleraldehyde is found in various types of flavors, fragrances, and pharmaceuticals. Cuminaldehyde is used in perfumes and cosmetics. Since we are exposed to these aldehydes, I wish to determine if they will react in vitro with nucleosides found in DNA. Isovaleraldehyde and Cuminaldehyde were allowed to react individually with 2’-deoxyguanosine, 2’-deoxycytosine, thymidine, and 2’-deoxyadenosine with dimethyl sulfoxide at 70OC for 48 hours. These reactions were conducted with and without the presence of arginine. 1H NMR spectra was obtained for each reaction mixture, and analyzed in order to determine if a product had formed.

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Apr 21st, 10:00 AM Apr 21st, 11:30 AM

Analyzing the Effects of Isovaleraldehyde and Cuminaldehyde on DNA

CSU Ballroom

Normal cells in the human body grow, divide, and die uniformly. If the normal cell’s DNA gets damaged, the cell will either repair it or die. Cancerous cells are cells that continue to grow instead of dying, so when a cancerous cell’s DNA is damaged the DNA will not be repaired, nor will it die off. The cancerous cell will continue to replicate the damaged DNA. This research involves the possible reaction of isovaleraldehyde and cuminaldehyde with DNA. This could cause damage to the cell’s DNA, and possibly lead to cancer. Isovaleraldehyde is found in various types of flavors, fragrances, and pharmaceuticals. Cuminaldehyde is used in perfumes and cosmetics. Since we are exposed to these aldehydes, I wish to determine if they will react in vitro with nucleosides found in DNA. Isovaleraldehyde and Cuminaldehyde were allowed to react individually with 2’-deoxyguanosine, 2’-deoxycytosine, thymidine, and 2’-deoxyadenosine with dimethyl sulfoxide at 70OC for 48 hours. These reactions were conducted with and without the presence of arginine. 1H NMR spectra was obtained for each reaction mixture, and analyzed in order to determine if a product had formed.

Recommended Citation

Bowman, Jenna. "Analyzing the Effects of Isovaleraldehyde and Cuminaldehyde on DNA." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 21, 2014.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2014/poster_session_A/34