Event Title

Further Investigating the Reactivity of Citral and Octanal toward DNA

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

21-4-2014 10:00 AM

End Date

21-4-2014 11:30 AM

Student's Major

Chemistry and Geology

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Mary Hadley

Mentor's Email Address

mary.hadley@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Chemistry and Geology

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

This year’s research is looking farther into interaction of the natural occurring aldehydes citral and octanal. These compounds are found naturally in fruits, grasses and are in perfumes and essential oils. Some of these foods are oranges and lemons, but citral is found in a high percentage in lemongrass oil. The research conducted last year found that citral and octanal were able to interact with 2’deoxyguanosine. Further research will be conducted to see if an adduct can be purified and characterized to understand the interaction of DNA and the two aldehydes. In the past, a number of aldehydes have been found to covalently bind to DNA for example acrolein and malondialdehyde. If citral and octanal are able to bond to the DNA, it could potentially be used for preventative measures in diseases because it could lead to repair of the strand of DNA that could have been damaged. By using this repair when aldehydes bond to the DNA it could be used to prevent many diseases that occur from the mutation of DNA such as cancer. Cancer is a growing issue across the globe and looking to discover different options for the preventative treatment versus the current treatment would be very beneficial for society because of the close to 7.6 million people who die of cancer annually.

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Apr 21st, 10:00 AM Apr 21st, 11:30 AM

Further Investigating the Reactivity of Citral and Octanal toward DNA

CSU Ballroom

This year’s research is looking farther into interaction of the natural occurring aldehydes citral and octanal. These compounds are found naturally in fruits, grasses and are in perfumes and essential oils. Some of these foods are oranges and lemons, but citral is found in a high percentage in lemongrass oil. The research conducted last year found that citral and octanal were able to interact with 2’deoxyguanosine. Further research will be conducted to see if an adduct can be purified and characterized to understand the interaction of DNA and the two aldehydes. In the past, a number of aldehydes have been found to covalently bind to DNA for example acrolein and malondialdehyde. If citral and octanal are able to bond to the DNA, it could potentially be used for preventative measures in diseases because it could lead to repair of the strand of DNA that could have been damaged. By using this repair when aldehydes bond to the DNA it could be used to prevent many diseases that occur from the mutation of DNA such as cancer. Cancer is a growing issue across the globe and looking to discover different options for the preventative treatment versus the current treatment would be very beneficial for society because of the close to 7.6 million people who die of cancer annually.

Recommended Citation

Leeder, Brittany. "Further Investigating the Reactivity of Citral and Octanal toward DNA." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 21, 2014.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2014/poster_session_A/37