Event Title

The Effect of Artificial Sweeteners on the Expression of microRNAs in Rat Kidneys

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

21-4-2014 10:00 AM

End Date

21-4-2014 11:30 AM

Student's Major

Chemistry and Geology

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Theresa Salerno

Mentor's Email Address

theresa.salerno@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Chemistry and Geology

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Stevia is an artificial sweetener designed to lower calorie use and reduce blood sugar. It is a modified oligosaccharide made up of three glucose molecules and a cyclic alcohol called steviol. Limited research studies have suggested that it might reduce blood pressure, but no evidence has been provided for the mechanism. There are many molecular players that control blood pressure and hypertension. Some of these proteins are part of the renin angiotensin system (RAS). Activation of both the angiotensin receptor 1 (AT1) and the prorenin receptor (PRR) result in the production of other proteins that increase blood pressure. MicroRNAs are short non-coding RNAs that bind to the 3’ un-translated region of targeted mRNAs and prevent them from making their proteins. MicroRNAs have been shown to decrease the expression of PRR and AT1 so they have potential to regulate blood pressure and hypertension. MiR-152 has been shown to repress the expression of PRR in retinal cells. High levels of MiR-132 have been associated with lowered AT1 expression.Therefore, MiR-152 and MiR-132 may affect hypertension and blood pressure. In this study male Wistar-Kyoto (normo-tensive) rats were given a diet of unsweetened osmolite, or osmolite sweetened with glucose, or saccharin, or stevia over a 6-week period. Kidneys were removed and frozen in liquid nitrogen. After microRNA isolation using the MirVANA kit (Ambion), qPCR methods were developed and validated for the quantitation of miR-132 and MiR-152 using U6 small nuclear RNA as the endogenous control. Preliminary results are inconclusive until more samples can be tested.

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Apr 21st, 10:00 AM Apr 21st, 11:30 AM

The Effect of Artificial Sweeteners on the Expression of microRNAs in Rat Kidneys

CSU Ballroom

Stevia is an artificial sweetener designed to lower calorie use and reduce blood sugar. It is a modified oligosaccharide made up of three glucose molecules and a cyclic alcohol called steviol. Limited research studies have suggested that it might reduce blood pressure, but no evidence has been provided for the mechanism. There are many molecular players that control blood pressure and hypertension. Some of these proteins are part of the renin angiotensin system (RAS). Activation of both the angiotensin receptor 1 (AT1) and the prorenin receptor (PRR) result in the production of other proteins that increase blood pressure. MicroRNAs are short non-coding RNAs that bind to the 3’ un-translated region of targeted mRNAs and prevent them from making their proteins. MicroRNAs have been shown to decrease the expression of PRR and AT1 so they have potential to regulate blood pressure and hypertension. MiR-152 has been shown to repress the expression of PRR in retinal cells. High levels of MiR-132 have been associated with lowered AT1 expression.Therefore, MiR-152 and MiR-132 may affect hypertension and blood pressure. In this study male Wistar-Kyoto (normo-tensive) rats were given a diet of unsweetened osmolite, or osmolite sweetened with glucose, or saccharin, or stevia over a 6-week period. Kidneys were removed and frozen in liquid nitrogen. After microRNA isolation using the MirVANA kit (Ambion), qPCR methods were developed and validated for the quantitation of miR-132 and MiR-152 using U6 small nuclear RNA as the endogenous control. Preliminary results are inconclusive until more samples can be tested.

Recommended Citation

Young, Natalie. "The Effect of Artificial Sweeteners on the Expression of microRNAs in Rat Kidneys." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 21, 2014.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2014/poster_session_A/47