Event Title

Anti-icing Effectiveness on Pavements Research

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

21-4-2014 10:00 AM

End Date

21-4-2014 11:30 AM

Student's Major

Mechanical and Civil Engineering

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Stephen Druschel

Mentor's Email Address

stephen.druschel@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Mechanical and Civil Engineering

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Unpredictable weather can cause dangerous road conditions resulting in multiple car accidents and even deaths. Sodium chloride, better known as salt, has been the choice for ice control for many years. Another option to prevent dangerous roads before a storm can be the application of anti-icing chemical. Anti-icing is the timely applications of a chemical freezing-point depressants in advance of a winter precipitation event. In-depth research on characteristics of anti-icers can help transportation agencies know how long anti-icing chemicals are affective during different weather conditions. The purpose of this experiment is to test anti-icing chemicals on different types of pavements with various amounts of precipitation. Samples of asphalt, concrete and open graded pavements of varying ages will be obtained from MnDOT. Twenty anti-icing chemicals will be used for testing. Multiple rainfall scenarios will be tested by collecting runoff from each pavement type. Pavement types will be placed in constant temperature chambers at four selected temperatures (28, 20, 12 and 0 degrees Fahrenheit) to see the amount of ice that accumulates. The time the anti-icers are applied to the pavements will be recorded and compared to the amount of ice that forms from different time applications. The results of this experiment should help MnDOT assess what anti-icing chemicals are cost effective for certain pavement types. Results will also help to find the time lapse available to MnDOT of the anti-icing application before a storm leading to accurate preparation in storm management.

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Apr 21st, 10:00 AM Apr 21st, 11:30 AM

Anti-icing Effectiveness on Pavements Research

CSU Ballroom

Unpredictable weather can cause dangerous road conditions resulting in multiple car accidents and even deaths. Sodium chloride, better known as salt, has been the choice for ice control for many years. Another option to prevent dangerous roads before a storm can be the application of anti-icing chemical. Anti-icing is the timely applications of a chemical freezing-point depressants in advance of a winter precipitation event. In-depth research on characteristics of anti-icers can help transportation agencies know how long anti-icing chemicals are affective during different weather conditions. The purpose of this experiment is to test anti-icing chemicals on different types of pavements with various amounts of precipitation. Samples of asphalt, concrete and open graded pavements of varying ages will be obtained from MnDOT. Twenty anti-icing chemicals will be used for testing. Multiple rainfall scenarios will be tested by collecting runoff from each pavement type. Pavement types will be placed in constant temperature chambers at four selected temperatures (28, 20, 12 and 0 degrees Fahrenheit) to see the amount of ice that accumulates. The time the anti-icers are applied to the pavements will be recorded and compared to the amount of ice that forms from different time applications. The results of this experiment should help MnDOT assess what anti-icing chemicals are cost effective for certain pavement types. Results will also help to find the time lapse available to MnDOT of the anti-icing application before a storm leading to accurate preparation in storm management.

Recommended Citation

Nguyen, Thu and Andrew Pfeffer. "Anti-icing Effectiveness on Pavements Research." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 21, 2014.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2014/poster_session_A/49