Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

21-4-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

21-4-2014 3:30 PM

Student's Major

Psychology

Student's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mentor's Name

Karla Lassonde

Mentor's Email Address

karla.lassonde@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Psychology

Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Description

The Testing Effect is known to enhance learning and long-term retention through repeated-testing (Roediger & Karpicke, 2006). One variable that has yet to be considered is the role of sustained attention on the efficacy of the testing effect. The goal of this study is to combine a measure of sustained attention (i.e., Sustained Attention Response Test-SART; Robertson, Manly, Andrade, Baddeley, & Yiend, 1997) with repeated quizzing of video lecture content to determine if sustained attention is important for the testing effect. Participants will be given the SART assessment and based on their score, as determined to be either high or low sustained attention, will be assigned to one of the following conditions: repeated testing, restudy, or control. We are interested in how participants with high sustained attention compare to those with low sustained attention on the video lecture tests. Specifically, we wonder whether or not high SART scores will influence the testing effect; that is, could participants with high attention do as well on the cumulative test as low sustainers who are in the repeated testing condition. Implications for teaching and learning will be discussed as well as inferring how results might be applied to populations diagnosed with attentional disorders.

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Apr 21st, 2:00 PM Apr 21st, 3:30 PM

Is Sustained Attention Important for the Testing Effect?

CSU Ballroom

The Testing Effect is known to enhance learning and long-term retention through repeated-testing (Roediger & Karpicke, 2006). One variable that has yet to be considered is the role of sustained attention on the efficacy of the testing effect. The goal of this study is to combine a measure of sustained attention (i.e., Sustained Attention Response Test-SART; Robertson, Manly, Andrade, Baddeley, & Yiend, 1997) with repeated quizzing of video lecture content to determine if sustained attention is important for the testing effect. Participants will be given the SART assessment and based on their score, as determined to be either high or low sustained attention, will be assigned to one of the following conditions: repeated testing, restudy, or control. We are interested in how participants with high sustained attention compare to those with low sustained attention on the video lecture tests. Specifically, we wonder whether or not high SART scores will influence the testing effect; that is, could participants with high attention do as well on the cumulative test as low sustainers who are in the repeated testing condition. Implications for teaching and learning will be discussed as well as inferring how results might be applied to populations diagnosed with attentional disorders.

Recommended Citation

Almoite, Maria and Jessica Kay. "Is Sustained Attention Important for the Testing Effect?." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 21, 2014.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2014/poster_session_B/31

 

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