Event Title

Heroism and Gender Roles: Influence of Publicity, Risk, and Familiarity on Heroism

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

21-4-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

21-4-2014 3:30 PM

Student's Major

Psychology

Student's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mentor's Name

Emily Stark

Mentor's Email Address

emily.stark@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Psychology

Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Description

Heroism, or any act of bravery or fearlessness, to help another person, is an occurrence that has been dramatized. Past research has investigated heroism and the perceived characteristics associated with heroism including gender. Research has shown that males are perceived to be more capable of heroism than females (Lyons, 2005). Gender differences are important to understand because of stigmas that can influence behavior. The current study explores how gender and the type of relationship with the victim influences willingness to engage in heroism. It is hypothesized that men will be more likely to help than women. The study consisted of 394 participants completing a survey along with open-ended questions. For each scenario participants were asked questions regarding whether the victim needed help and if they would help. Preliminary analysis suggests that characteristics of the scenario determined what gender thought the victim needed help t(388) = -3.96, p<0.080. In scenario two, involving a victim at a party, men were more likely to help than women but the opposite was true in scenario three, which involved an attack in an alley. There was also a significant effect of gender, as men reported they were more likely to help across all three scenarios, F(1, 386) = 11.52, p<0.001. The open-ended questions also show a gender bias. Further research is needed to look at other factors that could influence the likelihood of people engaging in heroic acts.

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Apr 21st, 2:00 PM Apr 21st, 3:30 PM

Heroism and Gender Roles: Influence of Publicity, Risk, and Familiarity on Heroism

CSU Ballroom

Heroism, or any act of bravery or fearlessness, to help another person, is an occurrence that has been dramatized. Past research has investigated heroism and the perceived characteristics associated with heroism including gender. Research has shown that males are perceived to be more capable of heroism than females (Lyons, 2005). Gender differences are important to understand because of stigmas that can influence behavior. The current study explores how gender and the type of relationship with the victim influences willingness to engage in heroism. It is hypothesized that men will be more likely to help than women. The study consisted of 394 participants completing a survey along with open-ended questions. For each scenario participants were asked questions regarding whether the victim needed help and if they would help. Preliminary analysis suggests that characteristics of the scenario determined what gender thought the victim needed help t(388) = -3.96, p<0.080. In scenario two, involving a victim at a party, men were more likely to help than women but the opposite was true in scenario three, which involved an attack in an alley. There was also a significant effect of gender, as men reported they were more likely to help across all three scenarios, F(1, 386) = 11.52, p<0.001. The open-ended questions also show a gender bias. Further research is needed to look at other factors that could influence the likelihood of people engaging in heroic acts.

Recommended Citation

Flegel, Shelby; Lauren Bach; and Katie Westermayer. "Heroism and Gender Roles: Influence of Publicity, Risk, and Familiarity on Heroism." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 21, 2014.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2014/poster_session_B/36