Event Title

Can Perceptually Demanding Encoding Tasks Help Dissociate Recollection-based and Familiarity-based Recognition Memory?

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

21-4-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

21-4-2014 3:30 PM

Student's Major

Psychology

Student's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mentor's Name

Moses Langley

Mentor's Email Address

moses.langley@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Psychology

Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Description

Many memory models assert that strength of familiarity-based recognition memory is based on the accumulation of evidence. A recurring question in the debate of how to model familiarity-based memory is what type of information can serve as “evidence”? This question is problematic, because although many dominant models of recognition memory assume the strength of evidence is important, they fail to define what characterizes evidence. We set out to evaluate what type of pictorial attributes might serve as evidence by displaying images that were visually transformed (mirror-reversed) while remaining identical in meaning.

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Apr 21st, 2:00 PM Apr 21st, 3:30 PM

Can Perceptually Demanding Encoding Tasks Help Dissociate Recollection-based and Familiarity-based Recognition Memory?

CSU Ballroom

Many memory models assert that strength of familiarity-based recognition memory is based on the accumulation of evidence. A recurring question in the debate of how to model familiarity-based memory is what type of information can serve as “evidence”? This question is problematic, because although many dominant models of recognition memory assume the strength of evidence is important, they fail to define what characterizes evidence. We set out to evaluate what type of pictorial attributes might serve as evidence by displaying images that were visually transformed (mirror-reversed) while remaining identical in meaning.

Recommended Citation

Hensersky, Travis. "Can Perceptually Demanding Encoding Tasks Help Dissociate Recollection-based and Familiarity-based Recognition Memory?." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 21, 2014.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2014/poster_session_B/37