Event Title

Predictive Variables for Enhancing Intercultural Competency among Undergraduates

Location

CSU 201

Start Date

20-4-2015 1:05 PM

End Date

20-4-2015 2:05 PM

Student's Major

Elementary and Early Childhood Education

Student's College

Education

Mentor's Name

Elizabeth Sandell

Mentor's Email Address

elizabeth.sandell@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Elementary and Early Childhood Education

Mentor's College

Education

Description

Increasing diversity among the population of the United States suggests the need for professionals to develop intercultural competency (IC) no matter what their area of expertise. For this study, IC was defined as “the capability to accurately understand and adapt behavior to cultural difference and commonality” (Hammer and Bennett, 2010). Such attitudes and skills will be critical for all fields, including teaching, health care, manufacturing, engineering, business, and more. An undergraduate education that emphasizes acceptance and adaptation to cultural differences can provide a foundation for success and impact throughout the world. This study examined the relationship between intentionallydesigned teaching methodologies in a Human Relations course and changes in IC among more than 450 university undergraduate students between 2010 and 2014 at a medium-sized Midwestern public university. The study responded to this research question: What instructional strategies affect changes in the IC of undergraduates? Data was collected at the beginning and conclusion of the course to measure changes in IC that occurred as a result of the course experiences. Students completed the Intercultural Development Inventory, developed by Hammer and Bennett (1998, 2001.) The survey [based on Bennett’s Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity (1986)] identified five orientations toward cultural differences: unawareness/denial, polarization, minimization, acceptance, and adaptation. Data was analyzed according to several instructional variables. Data was also analyzed about several noninstructional variables. The results of this study will encourage other instructors, professionals, and leaders to implement high-impact teaching methods that can foster IC in any content area of higher education.

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Apr 20th, 1:05 PM Apr 20th, 2:05 PM

Predictive Variables for Enhancing Intercultural Competency among Undergraduates

CSU 201

Increasing diversity among the population of the United States suggests the need for professionals to develop intercultural competency (IC) no matter what their area of expertise. For this study, IC was defined as “the capability to accurately understand and adapt behavior to cultural difference and commonality” (Hammer and Bennett, 2010). Such attitudes and skills will be critical for all fields, including teaching, health care, manufacturing, engineering, business, and more. An undergraduate education that emphasizes acceptance and adaptation to cultural differences can provide a foundation for success and impact throughout the world. This study examined the relationship between intentionallydesigned teaching methodologies in a Human Relations course and changes in IC among more than 450 university undergraduate students between 2010 and 2014 at a medium-sized Midwestern public university. The study responded to this research question: What instructional strategies affect changes in the IC of undergraduates? Data was collected at the beginning and conclusion of the course to measure changes in IC that occurred as a result of the course experiences. Students completed the Intercultural Development Inventory, developed by Hammer and Bennett (1998, 2001.) The survey [based on Bennett’s Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity (1986)] identified five orientations toward cultural differences: unawareness/denial, polarization, minimization, acceptance, and adaptation. Data was analyzed according to several instructional variables. Data was also analyzed about several noninstructional variables. The results of this study will encourage other instructors, professionals, and leaders to implement high-impact teaching methods that can foster IC in any content area of higher education.

Recommended Citation

Gibson, Katherine and Kwame Opoku Akyeampong. "Predictive Variables for Enhancing Intercultural Competency among Undergraduates." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 20, 2015.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2015/oral_session_07/2