Event Title

Effects of Ethanol Blended Fuel on Small Engines

Location

CSU 202

Start Date

20-4-2015 1:05 PM

End Date

20-4-2015 2:05 PM

Student's Major

Automotive and Manufacturing Engineering Technology

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Gary Mead

Mentor's Email Address

gary.mead@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Automotive and Manufacturing Engineering Technology

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Today gasoline sold in the United States is E10 (10% ethanol) but government has been trying to increase the allowable ethanol content in gasoline to concentrations as high as E20. Before this type of change can happen there needs to be sufficient research on the effects of these fuels on engines. The small engine ethanol study was focused on determining the effects of low level ethanol blends on 2- stroke trimmers. The engines in the study were operated on blends of 0%, 10%, 15%, and 20% ethanol. All 12 engines received performance, emission, and durability tests throughout their emissions determination period. The cycle used to age the engines was 51 seconds of wide open throttle and 9 seconds of idle. Performance test were contain three separate test such as starting test, acceleration test and, hot restart test. These test were used to test full throttle stability, maximum RPM under load, and multi-position stability on the engines. For the emission testing portion, exhaust gases were sampled and monitored for their levels for hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. After all testing was complete the engines were taken apart and measured to determine the effects on internal engine components. Research shows that E0 and E10 engines both lost 24.5% and 27.8% power and E15 engines lost 43.8% power while the E20 engines lost 33.9% power. E15 and E20 engines produced much more hydrocarbons throughout their lifetime. As a conclusion research indicates that ethanol blends above 10% produce less power throughout the lifetime of the engines tested.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 20th, 1:05 PM Apr 20th, 2:05 PM

Effects of Ethanol Blended Fuel on Small Engines

CSU 202

Today gasoline sold in the United States is E10 (10% ethanol) but government has been trying to increase the allowable ethanol content in gasoline to concentrations as high as E20. Before this type of change can happen there needs to be sufficient research on the effects of these fuels on engines. The small engine ethanol study was focused on determining the effects of low level ethanol blends on 2- stroke trimmers. The engines in the study were operated on blends of 0%, 10%, 15%, and 20% ethanol. All 12 engines received performance, emission, and durability tests throughout their emissions determination period. The cycle used to age the engines was 51 seconds of wide open throttle and 9 seconds of idle. Performance test were contain three separate test such as starting test, acceleration test and, hot restart test. These test were used to test full throttle stability, maximum RPM under load, and multi-position stability on the engines. For the emission testing portion, exhaust gases were sampled and monitored for their levels for hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. After all testing was complete the engines were taken apart and measured to determine the effects on internal engine components. Research shows that E0 and E10 engines both lost 24.5% and 27.8% power and E15 engines lost 43.8% power while the E20 engines lost 33.9% power. E15 and E20 engines produced much more hydrocarbons throughout their lifetime. As a conclusion research indicates that ethanol blends above 10% produce less power throughout the lifetime of the engines tested.

Recommended Citation

Kariyawasan Jalath Thanth, Charindu and Joshua Stumm. "Effects of Ethanol Blended Fuel on Small Engines." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 20, 2015.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2015/oral_session_08/3