Event Title

E85

Location

CSU 202

Start Date

20-4-2015 1:05 PM

End Date

20-4-2015 2:05 PM

Student's Major

Automotive and Manufacturing Engineering Technology

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Gary Mead

Mentor's Email Address

gary.mead@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Automotive and Manufacturing Engineering Technology

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

The use of ethanol as an alternative fuel has become popular in motorsport racing. Due to the nature of its chemistry, E85 (85% ethanol, 15% gasoline) has properties that allow race engines to perform at its peak potential. The benefits that a high performance race engine gains from using E85 are the ability to resist engine detonation and the cooling effect due to fuel vaporization. The ability for E85 to resist engine detonation and cooling the air/fuel intake charge plays a critical role in making horsepower and torque. As part of the FSAE regulation, only the use of gasoline or E85 is permitted. MNSU Formula Engine team has decided to experiment with E85 in a turbocharged YFZ450R engine. Turbocharging an engine allows more oxygen molecules to be forced into the cylinder also allowing more fuel thus more power. As the air is compressed, the temperature of the intake charge rises significantly, leading to engine detonation and eventually engine failure. Research was done on the use of E85 on the intake system to cool the intake charge. Using Star CCM, the intake manifold flow was simulated and tested. By strategically locating two fuel injectors on the intake manifold and engine management tuning of the fuel/ignition curves, the temperature of the intake charge was reduced significantly causing no engine knock, and power increase all across the engine RPM range. The data collected was used to compare with theoretical calculations of the heat of vaporization, air/fuel delivery, and also Brake Specific Fuel Consumption.

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Apr 20th, 1:05 PM Apr 20th, 2:05 PM

E85

CSU 202

The use of ethanol as an alternative fuel has become popular in motorsport racing. Due to the nature of its chemistry, E85 (85% ethanol, 15% gasoline) has properties that allow race engines to perform at its peak potential. The benefits that a high performance race engine gains from using E85 are the ability to resist engine detonation and the cooling effect due to fuel vaporization. The ability for E85 to resist engine detonation and cooling the air/fuel intake charge plays a critical role in making horsepower and torque. As part of the FSAE regulation, only the use of gasoline or E85 is permitted. MNSU Formula Engine team has decided to experiment with E85 in a turbocharged YFZ450R engine. Turbocharging an engine allows more oxygen molecules to be forced into the cylinder also allowing more fuel thus more power. As the air is compressed, the temperature of the intake charge rises significantly, leading to engine detonation and eventually engine failure. Research was done on the use of E85 on the intake system to cool the intake charge. Using Star CCM, the intake manifold flow was simulated and tested. By strategically locating two fuel injectors on the intake manifold and engine management tuning of the fuel/ignition curves, the temperature of the intake charge was reduced significantly causing no engine knock, and power increase all across the engine RPM range. The data collected was used to compare with theoretical calculations of the heat of vaporization, air/fuel delivery, and also Brake Specific Fuel Consumption.

Recommended Citation

Ngo, Loc; Larry Xiong; and Tom Zingsheim. "E85." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 20, 2015.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2015/oral_session_08/4