Event Title

Survival of Verminephrobacter in Amputated Worm Tails

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

20-4-2015 10:00 AM

End Date

20-4-2015 11:30 AM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Dorothy Wrigley

Mentor's Email Address

dorothy.wrigley@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Verminephrobacter is a genus of gram-negative bacteria that has been found in the nephridia of earthworms. The first species of this genus was identified and reported in 2008; however, there is a lack of information about its function. The earthworm Eisenia foetida transmits their nerphidial symbiont, V. eiseniae from parent to offspring via cocoons. Previous work in the laboratory showed that regenerated nephridia no longer possess the bacteria. Only the head end of a caudal amputation regenerates a full tail. The tail end, severed from the neurologic system, only forms the wound plug. The amputated tail segments remain responsive to stimuli for several weeks. In this project, we examined whether symbionts could survive in the tail of the earthworms after amputation, or whether they need communication with the head end of the worm to survive. Tails of E. foetida were amputated and allowed to heal and maintained in culture. The tails were examined for the symbiontsat the amputation and 3 weeks and 6 weeks later. The tails were stained using a fluorescent in situ hybridization method with Verminephrobacter-specific probe, Cys3-LSB 145. The results of staining 6 tails in day 0 showed the evidence of establishment of Verminophrobacter in the amputated tails. The results for the 3 and 6 weeks will be presented.

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Apr 20th, 10:00 AM Apr 20th, 11:30 AM

Survival of Verminephrobacter in Amputated Worm Tails

CSU Ballroom

Verminephrobacter is a genus of gram-negative bacteria that has been found in the nephridia of earthworms. The first species of this genus was identified and reported in 2008; however, there is a lack of information about its function. The earthworm Eisenia foetida transmits their nerphidial symbiont, V. eiseniae from parent to offspring via cocoons. Previous work in the laboratory showed that regenerated nephridia no longer possess the bacteria. Only the head end of a caudal amputation regenerates a full tail. The tail end, severed from the neurologic system, only forms the wound plug. The amputated tail segments remain responsive to stimuli for several weeks. In this project, we examined whether symbionts could survive in the tail of the earthworms after amputation, or whether they need communication with the head end of the worm to survive. Tails of E. foetida were amputated and allowed to heal and maintained in culture. The tails were examined for the symbiontsat the amputation and 3 weeks and 6 weeks later. The tails were stained using a fluorescent in situ hybridization method with Verminephrobacter-specific probe, Cys3-LSB 145. The results of staining 6 tails in day 0 showed the evidence of establishment of Verminophrobacter in the amputated tails. The results for the 3 and 6 weeks will be presented.

Recommended Citation

Pham, Anh. "Survival of Verminephrobacter in Amputated Worm Tails." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 20, 2015.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2015/poster_session_A/21