Event Title

Effect of Steroid Hormones on Neurogenesis in the Brain of the Green Anole Lizard

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

20-4-2015 10:00 AM

End Date

20-4-2015 11:30 AM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Rachel Cohen

Mentor's Email Address

rachel.cohen@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Our research project is focused on the effect of steroid hormones on neurogenesis in the brain of Anolis carolinensis. The seasonal changes in steroid hormone levels in these lizards are associated with changes in the morphology of brain regions controlling reproductive behaviors, such as the preoptic area (POA), medial amygdala (AMY), ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH). We examined how different steroid hormones influence the number of new neurons present in the brain. Specifically, we hypothesize that testosterone (T) will increase neurogenesis in the regions of the brain that control reproductive behaviors in green anole lizard. In this experiment, we utilized immunohistochemistry (IHC) to identify the effect of hormones on the addition of new cells in the brain. Adult male anoles were castrated and a capsule containing T, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), estradiol (E2), or left empty as a control was inserted. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), a compound that marks newly dividing cells, was injected into the animals once per day for five days. Tissue was collected 30 days after the last injection, frozen immediately and sectioned on a cryostat. We exposed the brain sections to antibodies for BrdU and Hu, a protein expressed exclusively in neurons. We counted the number of cells that were labeled with the antibodies for BrdU and/or Hu, which would indicate that the cells are new cells (BrdU only) or new neurons (BrdU and Hu doublelabeled). Our results will increase the understanding of how steroid hormones are influencing neurogenesis, which may be critical in determining future treatments for stroke or neurodegenerative disorders.

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Apr 20th, 10:00 AM Apr 20th, 11:30 AM

Effect of Steroid Hormones on Neurogenesis in the Brain of the Green Anole Lizard

CSU Ballroom

Our research project is focused on the effect of steroid hormones on neurogenesis in the brain of Anolis carolinensis. The seasonal changes in steroid hormone levels in these lizards are associated with changes in the morphology of brain regions controlling reproductive behaviors, such as the preoptic area (POA), medial amygdala (AMY), ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH). We examined how different steroid hormones influence the number of new neurons present in the brain. Specifically, we hypothesize that testosterone (T) will increase neurogenesis in the regions of the brain that control reproductive behaviors in green anole lizard. In this experiment, we utilized immunohistochemistry (IHC) to identify the effect of hormones on the addition of new cells in the brain. Adult male anoles were castrated and a capsule containing T, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), estradiol (E2), or left empty as a control was inserted. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), a compound that marks newly dividing cells, was injected into the animals once per day for five days. Tissue was collected 30 days after the last injection, frozen immediately and sectioned on a cryostat. We exposed the brain sections to antibodies for BrdU and Hu, a protein expressed exclusively in neurons. We counted the number of cells that were labeled with the antibodies for BrdU and/or Hu, which would indicate that the cells are new cells (BrdU only) or new neurons (BrdU and Hu doublelabeled). Our results will increase the understanding of how steroid hormones are influencing neurogenesis, which may be critical in determining future treatments for stroke or neurodegenerative disorders.

Recommended Citation

Lee, You Na and Jaeyong Son. "Effect of Steroid Hormones on Neurogenesis in the Brain of the Green Anole Lizard." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 20, 2015.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2015/poster_session_A/24