Event Title

Bactericidal Activity of Coelomic Cell of Eisenia fetida (Common Earthworm) to Mycobacterium Smegmatis

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

20-4-2015 10:00 AM

End Date

20-4-2015 11:30 AM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Dorothy Wrigley

Mentor's Email Address

dorothy.wrigley@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Several Mycobacterium species are pathogens for humans and farm animals, for example cattle. Reservoirs for cattle may include manure and composting plant material allowing bacteria to survive and infect more cattle. Controlling the growth of these organisms with a natural way is desirable, for example using earthworms. Earthworms are beneficial to ecosystems by modifying the chemical, physical and biological elements of the soil including the bacteria. This proposed research will help determine if coelomic cell extracts of Eisenia fetida have antimicrobial effects against Mycobacterium smegmatis, which is a non-pathogenic soil bacterium. Coelomic cells and fluids from year old earthworms were harvested. The cells were ruptured and the fluids and cellular extract sterilized. M. smegmatis mixed with coelomic cell extracts for several hours had no change bacterial viability as determined by a standard plate count. Neutral red uptake is a measure of the cells ability to ingest material. Although this procedure is still being optimized, preliminary data indicates that M smegmatis has no effect on neutral red uptake by earthworm coelomic cells. However, when mixed with an unrelated Escherichia coli, coelomic cells had a decreased uptake of neutral red. If these results are significant it will show that the coelomic cells interact with these two bacteria in different ways

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Apr 20th, 10:00 AM Apr 20th, 11:30 AM

Bactericidal Activity of Coelomic Cell of Eisenia fetida (Common Earthworm) to Mycobacterium Smegmatis

CSU Ballroom

Several Mycobacterium species are pathogens for humans and farm animals, for example cattle. Reservoirs for cattle may include manure and composting plant material allowing bacteria to survive and infect more cattle. Controlling the growth of these organisms with a natural way is desirable, for example using earthworms. Earthworms are beneficial to ecosystems by modifying the chemical, physical and biological elements of the soil including the bacteria. This proposed research will help determine if coelomic cell extracts of Eisenia fetida have antimicrobial effects against Mycobacterium smegmatis, which is a non-pathogenic soil bacterium. Coelomic cells and fluids from year old earthworms were harvested. The cells were ruptured and the fluids and cellular extract sterilized. M. smegmatis mixed with coelomic cell extracts for several hours had no change bacterial viability as determined by a standard plate count. Neutral red uptake is a measure of the cells ability to ingest material. Although this procedure is still being optimized, preliminary data indicates that M smegmatis has no effect on neutral red uptake by earthworm coelomic cells. However, when mixed with an unrelated Escherichia coli, coelomic cells had a decreased uptake of neutral red. If these results are significant it will show that the coelomic cells interact with these two bacteria in different ways

Recommended Citation

Jeffrey, Aleksandra. "Bactericidal Activity of Coelomic Cell of Eisenia fetida (Common Earthworm) to Mycobacterium Smegmatis." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 20, 2015.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2015/poster_session_A/9