Event Title

If I'm Not a Smoker Why Would I Listen to Your Ad? Exploring Smoking Cessation Advertisements for Social Smokers

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

20-4-2015 2:00 PM

End Date

20-4-2015 3:30 PM

Student's Major

Marketing and International Business

Student's College

Business

Mentor's Name

Kristin Scott

Mentor's Email Address

kristin.scott@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Marketing and International Business

Mentor's College

Business

Description

From 1993 to 2000, cigarette smoking declined among U.S. adults, with the exception of the young adult segment aged 18 to 24 years of age (Rigotti, Moran, and Wechsler 2005; Ling and Glantz 2004). This increase in smoking behavior may be due to increases in light smoking, especially social smoking among young adults. Recent research suggests that social smokers create a “protected prototype” in which they are able to control their smoking behaviors and overlook the health risks by perceiving themselves as not a real smoker (Scott, Mason, and Mason 2014). If social smokers do not see themselves as smokers, then regular anti-smoking advertisements will not appeal to them. Thus, the impact of anti-smoking advertisements for social smokers will not be as effective as for regular smokers and it will be difficult to appeal to them to quit smoking. The current research will investigate whether cessation advertisements can be designed to specifically target social smokers and encourage them to change their attitudes and behaviors towards smoking. Specifically, advertisements will be designed to break through the “protected prototype” that social smokers form to keep themselves safe from the stigma associated with smoking. Attitudes towards these ads will be compared among social and regular smokers who are college students. Results from this research will be especially helpful in the public health field to decrease smoking among social smokers. Therefore, it will suggest the effective way of communication with social smokers and how the cessation advertisements should appeal to them.

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Apr 20th, 2:00 PM Apr 20th, 3:30 PM

If I'm Not a Smoker Why Would I Listen to Your Ad? Exploring Smoking Cessation Advertisements for Social Smokers

CSU Ballroom

From 1993 to 2000, cigarette smoking declined among U.S. adults, with the exception of the young adult segment aged 18 to 24 years of age (Rigotti, Moran, and Wechsler 2005; Ling and Glantz 2004). This increase in smoking behavior may be due to increases in light smoking, especially social smoking among young adults. Recent research suggests that social smokers create a “protected prototype” in which they are able to control their smoking behaviors and overlook the health risks by perceiving themselves as not a real smoker (Scott, Mason, and Mason 2014). If social smokers do not see themselves as smokers, then regular anti-smoking advertisements will not appeal to them. Thus, the impact of anti-smoking advertisements for social smokers will not be as effective as for regular smokers and it will be difficult to appeal to them to quit smoking. The current research will investigate whether cessation advertisements can be designed to specifically target social smokers and encourage them to change their attitudes and behaviors towards smoking. Specifically, advertisements will be designed to break through the “protected prototype” that social smokers form to keep themselves safe from the stigma associated with smoking. Attitudes towards these ads will be compared among social and regular smokers who are college students. Results from this research will be especially helpful in the public health field to decrease smoking among social smokers. Therefore, it will suggest the effective way of communication with social smokers and how the cessation advertisements should appeal to them.

Recommended Citation

Jeon, Yuseong. "If I'm Not a Smoker Why Would I Listen to Your Ad? Exploring Smoking Cessation Advertisements for Social Smokers." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 20, 2015.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2015/poster_session_B/32