Event Title

A Case Study of Speech Therapy Effectiveness

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

20-4-2015 2:00 PM

End Date

20-4-2015 3:30 PM

Student's Major

Speech, Hearing, and Rehabilitation Services

Student's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Mentor's Name

Megan Mahowald

Mentor's Email Address

megan.mahowald@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Speech, Hearing, and Rehabilitation Services

Mentor's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Second Mentor's Name

Renee Shellum

Second Mentor's Email Address

renee.shellum@mnsu.edu

Second Mentor's Department

Speech, Hearing, and Rehabilitation Services

Second Mentor's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Description

In the current study, I explored whether or not speech therapy was effective with a ten-year-old child. The child is an elementary student whom was adopted from a third world country. I implemented 10 therapy sessions based around his/her target articulation goals which included literacy, hands on activities, and a final presentations on his/her native country. The data sources collected were: audio samples, interviews, and his own knowledge about his/her native language. Data was collected by reviewing speech accuracy (percent of correct sounds) in audio samples and interview questions. There were noticeable improvements in articulation of connected speech across the 10 sessions. A baseline of 79.6% accuracy of sounds in connected speech progressed to 93.8% accuracy. The most significant finding in this study was the impact of prior knowledge a Speech- Language Pathologist should obtain before working with an adopted child who has a diverse linguistic background. Understanding a child’s native language can lead to important therapeutic implications. This particular child has learned a phonetic alphabet that did not include the particular sounds in English that he/she was unable to produce. Once the child was aware that his/her mispronunciations were based on his linguistic knowledge versus his/her ability to produce the sound confidence increased and therapy was successful.

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Apr 20th, 2:00 PM Apr 20th, 3:30 PM

A Case Study of Speech Therapy Effectiveness

CSU Ballroom

In the current study, I explored whether or not speech therapy was effective with a ten-year-old child. The child is an elementary student whom was adopted from a third world country. I implemented 10 therapy sessions based around his/her target articulation goals which included literacy, hands on activities, and a final presentations on his/her native country. The data sources collected were: audio samples, interviews, and his own knowledge about his/her native language. Data was collected by reviewing speech accuracy (percent of correct sounds) in audio samples and interview questions. There were noticeable improvements in articulation of connected speech across the 10 sessions. A baseline of 79.6% accuracy of sounds in connected speech progressed to 93.8% accuracy. The most significant finding in this study was the impact of prior knowledge a Speech- Language Pathologist should obtain before working with an adopted child who has a diverse linguistic background. Understanding a child’s native language can lead to important therapeutic implications. This particular child has learned a phonetic alphabet that did not include the particular sounds in English that he/she was unable to produce. Once the child was aware that his/her mispronunciations were based on his linguistic knowledge versus his/her ability to produce the sound confidence increased and therapy was successful.

Recommended Citation

Haglin, Kathryn. "A Case Study of Speech Therapy Effectiveness." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 20, 2015.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2015/poster_session_B/4