Event Title

Effectiveness of Spending and Median Household Income on Education

Location

CSU 202

Start Date

18-4-2016 10:00 AM

End Date

18-4-2016 11:00 AM

Student's Major

Economics

Student's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mentor's Name

Phillip Miller

Mentor's Department

Economics

Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Description

According to the ACT organization, 1,845,787 students took the ACT in 2014, over 200,000 more than those who took the SAT. The ACT score students receive upon completion is used to assess almost every college admission review. The importance of this paper is twofold, first is to determine the effectiveness of state and federal funding on student learning, second the importance of socioeconomic variables in determining the student’s level of intelligence. The significance of raising scores means that students themselves are more intelligent and thus more prepared for post-secondary education. We will be testing whether an increase in combined state and federal spending has a positive or no relationship with ACT scores for each state. Along with the variable of each state’s spending of education, we will be looking at the median household income for each state over the course of several years. This will answer the question of does having more money for each household equate to better test scores among states. The answers to these questions can lend to a more practical means of increasing ACT scores among students rather than wasting tax dollars that may be more useful being allotted somewhere else. The empirical findings show that there is a is no significance relationship between funding and changes in ACT scores, along with those finding, median household income is statistically significant to the changes in ACT scores.

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Apr 18th, 10:00 AM Apr 18th, 11:00 AM

Effectiveness of Spending and Median Household Income on Education

CSU 202

According to the ACT organization, 1,845,787 students took the ACT in 2014, over 200,000 more than those who took the SAT. The ACT score students receive upon completion is used to assess almost every college admission review. The importance of this paper is twofold, first is to determine the effectiveness of state and federal funding on student learning, second the importance of socioeconomic variables in determining the student’s level of intelligence. The significance of raising scores means that students themselves are more intelligent and thus more prepared for post-secondary education. We will be testing whether an increase in combined state and federal spending has a positive or no relationship with ACT scores for each state. Along with the variable of each state’s spending of education, we will be looking at the median household income for each state over the course of several years. This will answer the question of does having more money for each household equate to better test scores among states. The answers to these questions can lend to a more practical means of increasing ACT scores among students rather than wasting tax dollars that may be more useful being allotted somewhere else. The empirical findings show that there is a is no significance relationship between funding and changes in ACT scores, along with those finding, median household income is statistically significant to the changes in ACT scores.

Recommended Citation

Haala, Clint. "Effectiveness of Spending and Median Household Income on Education." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 18, 2016.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2016/oral-session-02/2