Event Title

Formula Society of Automotive Engineers Injector Flow

Location

CSU 203

Start Date

18-4-2016 11:05 AM

End Date

18-4-2016 12:05 PM

Student's Major

Automotive and Manufacturing Engineering Technology

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Bruce Jones

Mentor's Department

Automotive and Manufacturing Engineering Technology

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Second Mentor's Name

Gary Mead

Second Mentor's Department

Automotive and Manufacturing Engineering Technology

Second Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

The motivation behind this research project was to investigate the use of fuel to cool the air that enters the engine. The value of this information is furthering the Minnesota State University, Mankato Formula SAE teams understanding of controlling intake air temperatures. The goal of the research was to validate if an opposed flow injection could increase power in practice as the calculations have shown. To accomplish our goal, we would test for horsepower produced at the wheels on a Superflow chassis dynamometer. We would attain horsepower numbers of three setups with different injector sizing, pulse width, and orientation. The intake tract would also be checked for pooling to determine if the injected fuel is effectively atomizing and mixing with the air. From our research and the previous year’s results, it is certain that a secondary injector does decrease the intake air temperature in the manifold. Last year’s team used opposed flow injection with the secondary injector placed after the plenum. Our research wanted to test using co-flow injection before the turbocharger and opposed-flow injection after the turbocharger. The thought process here is that in compressing the air, the turbocharger will increase the temperature of the air charge. If we are able to cool the charge during or right after compression, we will see cooler intake temperatures. By pointing the injector directly at the compressor wheel, we will be able to use turbulent air in the compressor housing to help facilitate fuel atomization.

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Apr 18th, 11:05 AM Apr 18th, 12:05 PM

Formula Society of Automotive Engineers Injector Flow

CSU 203

The motivation behind this research project was to investigate the use of fuel to cool the air that enters the engine. The value of this information is furthering the Minnesota State University, Mankato Formula SAE teams understanding of controlling intake air temperatures. The goal of the research was to validate if an opposed flow injection could increase power in practice as the calculations have shown. To accomplish our goal, we would test for horsepower produced at the wheels on a Superflow chassis dynamometer. We would attain horsepower numbers of three setups with different injector sizing, pulse width, and orientation. The intake tract would also be checked for pooling to determine if the injected fuel is effectively atomizing and mixing with the air. From our research and the previous year’s results, it is certain that a secondary injector does decrease the intake air temperature in the manifold. Last year’s team used opposed flow injection with the secondary injector placed after the plenum. Our research wanted to test using co-flow injection before the turbocharger and opposed-flow injection after the turbocharger. The thought process here is that in compressing the air, the turbocharger will increase the temperature of the air charge. If we are able to cool the charge during or right after compression, we will see cooler intake temperatures. By pointing the injector directly at the compressor wheel, we will be able to use turbulent air in the compressor housing to help facilitate fuel atomization.

Recommended Citation

Ige, Olumide. "Formula Society of Automotive Engineers Injector Flow." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 18, 2016.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2016/oral-session-06/3