Event Title

Spinning Charlotte's Web: The Intersectional System of Meat, Cancer, and Capitalism

Location

CSU 204

Start Date

18-4-2016 1:05 PM

End Date

18-4-2016 2:05 PM

Student's Major

Sociology and Corrections

Student's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mentor's Name

Carol Glasser

Mentor's Department

Sociology and Corrections

Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Description

As more pronounced arguments are made about meat consumption harming various aspects of public health, those who live in communities which house slaughterhouses must negotiate what it means to live in this community, to work in this community, and to be financially supported by the industry. In this study of one Midwestern town, the two main industries are a slaughterhouse and a cancer research institute which are owned by the same company. Previous research has shown that meat consumption and slaughterhouses largely affect the environment, public health, and animals. As processed meat has been classified as a carcinogen that causes cancer, the community that is studied still continues to support both the slaughterhouse and cancer research institute despite potential effects on their housing, health, and safety. Understanding how people negotiate the roles that the two main industries play in their community through semi-structured interviews is the primary purpose of this exploratory study.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 18th, 1:05 PM Apr 18th, 2:05 PM

Spinning Charlotte's Web: The Intersectional System of Meat, Cancer, and Capitalism

CSU 204

As more pronounced arguments are made about meat consumption harming various aspects of public health, those who live in communities which house slaughterhouses must negotiate what it means to live in this community, to work in this community, and to be financially supported by the industry. In this study of one Midwestern town, the two main industries are a slaughterhouse and a cancer research institute which are owned by the same company. Previous research has shown that meat consumption and slaughterhouses largely affect the environment, public health, and animals. As processed meat has been classified as a carcinogen that causes cancer, the community that is studied still continues to support both the slaughterhouse and cancer research institute despite potential effects on their housing, health, and safety. Understanding how people negotiate the roles that the two main industries play in their community through semi-structured interviews is the primary purpose of this exploratory study.

Recommended Citation

Flaherty, Ashley. "Spinning Charlotte's Web: The Intersectional System of Meat, Cancer, and Capitalism." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 18, 2016.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2016/oral-session-11/1