Event Title

Am I Still a Slave?: An Analysis of Critical Race Theory

Location

CSU 204

Start Date

18-4-2016 1:05 PM

End Date

18-4-2016 2:05 PM

Student's Major

Sociology and Corrections

Student's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mentor's Name

Afroza Anwary

Mentor's Department

Sociology and Corrections

Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Description

Our social world can be intriguing and disorientating, profound and overwhelming, though the complexities of living and learning from it become daunting toward the realities of our social issues. The "War on Drugs" has become nothing less of a more perplexing set of policies that has done nothing well toward solving any of the issues it was set on fixing. The war has become, as it could be argued has always been, (a war) on minorities. Nothing short of stunting any, and all progress of the Civil Rights Movement, Black Americans are incarcerated six times more than Whites, though White Americans are five times more likely to consume drugs (Fortner and Warde 2013). Black Americans have seen time and time again, social policies, stigmas, and blatant racism, consume American idealism. The war has been a pariah to the culture and society nationally, where many Black Americans feel it has become a criminal justice system that favors their subordinance. This analysis focusing on Critical Race Theory and Blumer's Group-Position Theory, attempts to understand the complexities of race, society, and culture holistically, which has become a glaring hypocrisy. Much of the research is secondary content analysis from a chronological and historical perspective, using fairly contemporary journals, that provide much of the analysis of previous research and highlight the disparities and complexities of the issue. The drug apartheid has "misled people, wasted resources, damaged lives, and distract the issues from purposeful addressment" (Buchanan 2015). Serious understanding has to become of this issue so that it does not continue the perpetual psychosis of lunacy.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 18th, 1:05 PM Apr 18th, 2:05 PM

Am I Still a Slave?: An Analysis of Critical Race Theory

CSU 204

Our social world can be intriguing and disorientating, profound and overwhelming, though the complexities of living and learning from it become daunting toward the realities of our social issues. The "War on Drugs" has become nothing less of a more perplexing set of policies that has done nothing well toward solving any of the issues it was set on fixing. The war has become, as it could be argued has always been, (a war) on minorities. Nothing short of stunting any, and all progress of the Civil Rights Movement, Black Americans are incarcerated six times more than Whites, though White Americans are five times more likely to consume drugs (Fortner and Warde 2013). Black Americans have seen time and time again, social policies, stigmas, and blatant racism, consume American idealism. The war has been a pariah to the culture and society nationally, where many Black Americans feel it has become a criminal justice system that favors their subordinance. This analysis focusing on Critical Race Theory and Blumer's Group-Position Theory, attempts to understand the complexities of race, society, and culture holistically, which has become a glaring hypocrisy. Much of the research is secondary content analysis from a chronological and historical perspective, using fairly contemporary journals, that provide much of the analysis of previous research and highlight the disparities and complexities of the issue. The drug apartheid has "misled people, wasted resources, damaged lives, and distract the issues from purposeful addressment" (Buchanan 2015). Serious understanding has to become of this issue so that it does not continue the perpetual psychosis of lunacy.

Recommended Citation

Rolph, Thomas. "Am I Still a Slave?: An Analysis of Critical Race Theory." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 18, 2016.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2016/oral-session-11/2