Event Title

Are Hypothyroidism-Induced Reductions in Brain Derived Igf1 Due to Reducations in Serum Growth Hormone?

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

18-4-2016 10:00 AM

End Date

18-4-2016 11:30 AM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

David Sharlin

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Low thyroid hormone (TH) during development results in permanent neurological deficits. Similarly, low insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1) during development results in neurological deficits. Furthermore, studies in rodents have documented similar neuroanatomical defects between low TH and low Igf1. TH, GH, and Igf1 interact at the hypothalamus, pituitary, and liver; contributing to circulating levels of Igf1. Considering this, it is reasonable to propose that changes in locally produced brain Igf1 following thyroid hormone insufficiency is due, in part, to a disruption of the TH-GH-Igf1 axis. To clarify this, we are testing whether changes in brain Igf1 mRNA is an indirect result of changes in serum GH that accompany low TH. Two groups of timed pregnant mice will be used: control and hypothyroid.

Hypothyroid dams will be treated on embryonic day 14 with chemicals that inhibit thyroid gland function. To test the idea that changes in brain-derived Igf1 following hypothyroidism are independent of changes that occur in serum growth hormone, hypothyroid and control pups will be injected daily with growth hormone or saline from postnatal day (P) 1 until P14. At P14, experimental pups will euthanized, and serum and brain tissue will be collected for analysis of serum hormones and brain Igf1. It is predicted that growth hormone provisions provided to hypothyroid pups will have no effect on the hypothyroidism-induced reductions in brain Igf1; supporting the idea that reduction in brain-derived Igf1 levels following hypothyroidism are independent of the serum growth hormone changes.

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Apr 18th, 10:00 AM Apr 18th, 11:30 AM

Are Hypothyroidism-Induced Reductions in Brain Derived Igf1 Due to Reducations in Serum Growth Hormone?

CSU Ballroom

Low thyroid hormone (TH) during development results in permanent neurological deficits. Similarly, low insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1) during development results in neurological deficits. Furthermore, studies in rodents have documented similar neuroanatomical defects between low TH and low Igf1. TH, GH, and Igf1 interact at the hypothalamus, pituitary, and liver; contributing to circulating levels of Igf1. Considering this, it is reasonable to propose that changes in locally produced brain Igf1 following thyroid hormone insufficiency is due, in part, to a disruption of the TH-GH-Igf1 axis. To clarify this, we are testing whether changes in brain Igf1 mRNA is an indirect result of changes in serum GH that accompany low TH. Two groups of timed pregnant mice will be used: control and hypothyroid.

Hypothyroid dams will be treated on embryonic day 14 with chemicals that inhibit thyroid gland function. To test the idea that changes in brain-derived Igf1 following hypothyroidism are independent of changes that occur in serum growth hormone, hypothyroid and control pups will be injected daily with growth hormone or saline from postnatal day (P) 1 until P14. At P14, experimental pups will euthanized, and serum and brain tissue will be collected for analysis of serum hormones and brain Igf1. It is predicted that growth hormone provisions provided to hypothyroid pups will have no effect on the hypothyroidism-induced reductions in brain Igf1; supporting the idea that reduction in brain-derived Igf1 levels following hypothyroidism are independent of the serum growth hormone changes.

Recommended Citation

Rice, Anna and Alec Wright. "Are Hypothyroidism-Induced Reductions in Brain Derived Igf1 Due to Reducations in Serum Growth Hormone?." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 18, 2016.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2016/poster-session-A/17