Event Title

Monumental Architecture: The Nazi Rally Grounds

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

18-4-2016 2:00 PM

End Date

18-4-2016 3:30 PM

Student's Major

World Languages and Cultures

Student's College

Arts and Humanities

Mentor's Name

Nadja Krämer

Mentor's Department

World Languages and Cultures

Mentor's College

Arts and Humanities

Description

The research looks at the Nazi Party rally grounds within Nürnberg, Germany. The rally grounds were used as the center of Nazi propaganda and served as a gathering place for hundreds of thousands of Nazi supporters. Within these grounds, the Nazis showcased their military might and focused on anchoring Germanic patriotism/collectiveness as an entity during their annual rally. Nürnberg was once an Imperial capital for the Holy Roman Empire and also represents the embodiment of a medieval German city. Adolf Hitler and his Nazi party used this location to bolster nostalgia and connect the Third Reich to the First Reich. Hitler dreamed of grandeur and added monumental architecture to leave a mark and begin the new Aryan Empire. We are part of a faculty-led Study Tour to Germany and Austria during spring break 2016. We will present, through first-hand experience, how the architecture of the Nazi rally grounds is connected to the past and how Germans view and treat the remains of this area today. The project provides insight into both the architecture’s purpose and how the German people have chosen to coexist with the memory that lies within these buildings.

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Apr 18th, 2:00 PM Apr 18th, 3:30 PM

Monumental Architecture: The Nazi Rally Grounds

CSU Ballroom

The research looks at the Nazi Party rally grounds within Nürnberg, Germany. The rally grounds were used as the center of Nazi propaganda and served as a gathering place for hundreds of thousands of Nazi supporters. Within these grounds, the Nazis showcased their military might and focused on anchoring Germanic patriotism/collectiveness as an entity during their annual rally. Nürnberg was once an Imperial capital for the Holy Roman Empire and also represents the embodiment of a medieval German city. Adolf Hitler and his Nazi party used this location to bolster nostalgia and connect the Third Reich to the First Reich. Hitler dreamed of grandeur and added monumental architecture to leave a mark and begin the new Aryan Empire. We are part of a faculty-led Study Tour to Germany and Austria during spring break 2016. We will present, through first-hand experience, how the architecture of the Nazi rally grounds is connected to the past and how Germans view and treat the remains of this area today. The project provides insight into both the architecture’s purpose and how the German people have chosen to coexist with the memory that lies within these buildings.

Recommended Citation

Berbrich, Hunter and Scott Parker. "Monumental Architecture: The Nazi Rally Grounds." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 18, 2016.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2016/poster-session-B/12