Event Title

Stone Memories: Monarchy to Democracy in Brick and Mortar

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

18-4-2016 2:00 PM

End Date

18-4-2016 3:30 PM

Student's Major

World Languages and Cultures

Student's College

Arts and Humanities

Mentor's Name

Nadja Krämer

Mentor's Department

World Languages and Cultures

Mentor's College

Arts and Humanities

Description

Sigmund Freud asserted, “Now let us make the fantastic supposition that Rome were not a human dwelling-place, but a mental entity with just as long and varied past history: that is, in which nothing once constructed had perished, and all the earlier stages of development had survived alongside the latest” (Civilization and Its Discontents). This suggests that buildings may come and go, but their existences have lasting social and political implications that reverberate into the present; even if other buildings have been constructed in their place. The epitome of this idea can be seen in the Palace of the Republic/Stadtschloss/Humboldt Forum in Berlin. The Stadtschloss (City Palace) was the seat of power of the Hohenzollern dynasty from the 15th century and served the monarchy until its downfall in 1918. During the time of the German Democratic Republic it was demolished in 1950 and the Palace of the Republic, or the East German Parliament, eventually replaced the palace. After the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Palace of the Republic was destroyed. A heated discussion ensued on what should stand now in its place. Eventually, it was settled to rebuild the Stadtschloss in almost the same manner; however, it will be a museum as well, named the Humboldt Forum. As a member of a faculty-led trip to Berlin, I will examine through firsthand experience the Humboldt Forum and how it shows that impressions from the past remain to this day in the present.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 18th, 2:00 PM Apr 18th, 3:30 PM

Stone Memories: Monarchy to Democracy in Brick and Mortar

CSU Ballroom

Sigmund Freud asserted, “Now let us make the fantastic supposition that Rome were not a human dwelling-place, but a mental entity with just as long and varied past history: that is, in which nothing once constructed had perished, and all the earlier stages of development had survived alongside the latest” (Civilization and Its Discontents). This suggests that buildings may come and go, but their existences have lasting social and political implications that reverberate into the present; even if other buildings have been constructed in their place. The epitome of this idea can be seen in the Palace of the Republic/Stadtschloss/Humboldt Forum in Berlin. The Stadtschloss (City Palace) was the seat of power of the Hohenzollern dynasty from the 15th century and served the monarchy until its downfall in 1918. During the time of the German Democratic Republic it was demolished in 1950 and the Palace of the Republic, or the East German Parliament, eventually replaced the palace. After the fall of the Berlin Wall, the Palace of the Republic was destroyed. A heated discussion ensued on what should stand now in its place. Eventually, it was settled to rebuild the Stadtschloss in almost the same manner; however, it will be a museum as well, named the Humboldt Forum. As a member of a faculty-led trip to Berlin, I will examine through firsthand experience the Humboldt Forum and how it shows that impressions from the past remain to this day in the present.

Recommended Citation

Nickel, Cody. "Stone Memories: Monarchy to Democracy in Brick and Mortar." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 18, 2016.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2016/poster-session-B/16