Event Title

Evaluating Anaerobic Work Capacity Using Time and Intensity in Cyclists Performing High-Intensity Interval Training

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

18-4-2016 2:00 PM

End Date

18-4-2016 3:30 PM

Student's Major

Human Performance

Student's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Mentor's Name

Robert Pettitt

Mentor's Department

Human Performance

Mentor's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Second Mentor's Name

Zachary Roloff

Second Mentor's Department

Human Performance

Second Mentor's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Description

The 3-min all-out exercise test (3 MT) was derived as a method to estimate CP and W’. The cycling 3 MT with a verification bout also provides VO2max. Prior researchers have used the 3 MT to prescribe and evaluate high-intensity intervals; however, the metabolic response of these intervals relative to VO2max has not been directly reported. Purpose: We investigated the efficacy of prescribing intervals based off of CP and W’ values acquired from a 3 MT performed on a CompuTrainer. Methods: 5 trained male cyclists completed a 3 MT. Each subject brought their personal road bike to the lab and affixed it to the CompuTrainer for the 3 MT and 4 different interval sets. The interval sets were 3 minutes with a 60% depletion of W’, 3 minutes with an 80% depletion of W’, 5 minutes with a 60% depletion of W’, and 5 minutes with an 80% depletion of W’. The power output for the intervals was determined using the inverse time model. Consistency of the end VO2 values relative to VO2max was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), typical error (TE), and coefficient of variation (CV). Results: Peak VO2 (ml/kg/min) values from the 3 MT (58 ± 7), 3 min 60% (57 ± 7), 3 min 80% (59 ± 6), 5 min 60% (54 ± 7), 5 min 80% (56 ± 7) interval sets did not differ (F = 2.41, p = 0.41). There was a high level of measurement agreement between each of the VO2 values (ICC = 0.92, TE = 1.54 ml/kg/min, CV = 2.9%). Conclusion: The intervals prescribed from CP and W’ values acquired from a 3 MT performed on a CompuTrainer are accurate and will evoke VO2max.

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Apr 18th, 2:00 PM Apr 18th, 3:30 PM

Evaluating Anaerobic Work Capacity Using Time and Intensity in Cyclists Performing High-Intensity Interval Training

CSU Ballroom

The 3-min all-out exercise test (3 MT) was derived as a method to estimate CP and W’. The cycling 3 MT with a verification bout also provides VO2max. Prior researchers have used the 3 MT to prescribe and evaluate high-intensity intervals; however, the metabolic response of these intervals relative to VO2max has not been directly reported. Purpose: We investigated the efficacy of prescribing intervals based off of CP and W’ values acquired from a 3 MT performed on a CompuTrainer. Methods: 5 trained male cyclists completed a 3 MT. Each subject brought their personal road bike to the lab and affixed it to the CompuTrainer for the 3 MT and 4 different interval sets. The interval sets were 3 minutes with a 60% depletion of W’, 3 minutes with an 80% depletion of W’, 5 minutes with a 60% depletion of W’, and 5 minutes with an 80% depletion of W’. The power output for the intervals was determined using the inverse time model. Consistency of the end VO2 values relative to VO2max was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), typical error (TE), and coefficient of variation (CV). Results: Peak VO2 (ml/kg/min) values from the 3 MT (58 ± 7), 3 min 60% (57 ± 7), 3 min 80% (59 ± 6), 5 min 60% (54 ± 7), 5 min 80% (56 ± 7) interval sets did not differ (F = 2.41, p = 0.41). There was a high level of measurement agreement between each of the VO2 values (ICC = 0.92, TE = 1.54 ml/kg/min, CV = 2.9%). Conclusion: The intervals prescribed from CP and W’ values acquired from a 3 MT performed on a CompuTrainer are accurate and will evoke VO2max.

Recommended Citation

Krynski, Luke. "Evaluating Anaerobic Work Capacity Using Time and Intensity in Cyclists Performing High-Intensity Interval Training." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 18, 2016.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2016/poster-session-B/19