Event Title

Pondering Processes Used by Families Managing the Chronic Illness Experience

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

18-4-2016 2:00 PM

End Date

18-4-2016 3:30 PM

Student's Major

School of Nursing

Student's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Mentor's Name

Norma Krumwiede

Mentor's Department

School of Nursing

Mentor's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Description

Family nursing has been evolving since the 1980’s, yet there is still limited research pertaining to the family chronic illness experience. Effects of chronic illness are not restricted to the individual and can be described as a family affair. The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify pondering processes that support families experiencing a chronic illness. Understanding how families use the process of pondering when managing the chronic illness may identify family patterns, roles, and inform a collaborative process to execute novel strategies for family decision making. Utilizing Strauss & Corbin’s grounded theory paradigm model of open and axial coding, data from nine archived family interview transcripts were examined to answer the research question: How do families use the process of pondering when a family member has a chronic illness? Findings revealed two causal factors- perceived family threats and unpredictability. The core phenomenon is the ongoing, dynamic process of pondering in order to reflect on important decisions and find shared meaning. Intervening factors were determined to be either facilitating or constraining in nature; findings showed facilitating factors of hope, spirituality, and religion; support and resources; and continuity in roles. While facilitating factors positively influenced outcomes, constraining factors hindered them. Constraining factors included stress, poor relationships, and vulnerability. Several nursing action/interaction strategies were identified to support the family’s development of effective pondering strategies. Consequences include reaching meaning and understanding, reflecting on decisions, and enhancing family relationships. The use of pondering assists families to alleviate stress, worry, and anxiety.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 18th, 2:00 PM Apr 18th, 3:30 PM

Pondering Processes Used by Families Managing the Chronic Illness Experience

CSU Ballroom

Family nursing has been evolving since the 1980’s, yet there is still limited research pertaining to the family chronic illness experience. Effects of chronic illness are not restricted to the individual and can be described as a family affair. The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify pondering processes that support families experiencing a chronic illness. Understanding how families use the process of pondering when managing the chronic illness may identify family patterns, roles, and inform a collaborative process to execute novel strategies for family decision making. Utilizing Strauss & Corbin’s grounded theory paradigm model of open and axial coding, data from nine archived family interview transcripts were examined to answer the research question: How do families use the process of pondering when a family member has a chronic illness? Findings revealed two causal factors- perceived family threats and unpredictability. The core phenomenon is the ongoing, dynamic process of pondering in order to reflect on important decisions and find shared meaning. Intervening factors were determined to be either facilitating or constraining in nature; findings showed facilitating factors of hope, spirituality, and religion; support and resources; and continuity in roles. While facilitating factors positively influenced outcomes, constraining factors hindered them. Constraining factors included stress, poor relationships, and vulnerability. Several nursing action/interaction strategies were identified to support the family’s development of effective pondering strategies. Consequences include reaching meaning and understanding, reflecting on decisions, and enhancing family relationships. The use of pondering assists families to alleviate stress, worry, and anxiety.

Recommended Citation

Reynolds, Tara. "Pondering Processes Used by Families Managing the Chronic Illness Experience." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 18, 2016.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2016/poster-session-B/24