Event Title

Increase in Nutritional and Wellness Research: Challenging the Hyper-Thin Female Dancer

Location

CSU 201

Start Date

11-4-2017 11:05 AM

End Date

11-4-2017 12:05 PM

Student's Major

Theatre and Dance

Student's College

Arts and Humanities

Mentor's Name

Julie Kerr-Berry

Mentor's Department

Theatre and Dance

Mentor's College

Arts and Humanities

Description

This paper focuses on whether an increase in nutritional and wellness research challenges the hyper-thin female ballet dancer. Female ballet dancers are known for being hyper-thin, which implies they do not eat enough. Through research into current literature on nutrition and wellness, as well as by conducting interviews, this paper will argue that there is a need for ballet dancers to be educated in these two areas. This paper will also argue that even through current research has been conducted with regard to dancer nutrition and wellness, and that ballet dancers have access to it, it does not mean they are taking advantage of it. Furthermore, this paper will contend that ballet dancers may think they are eating healthy, but in reality, their caloric and nutritional intake is low. It will conclude that the ballet world needs to change from within and that the need to be hyper-thin has to change in order for ballet dancers to be truly healthy. Dance companies like the St. Paul Ballet are stepping in the right direction by introducing Take Back the Tutu, which is a health and wellness series for dancers.

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Apr 11th, 11:05 AM Apr 11th, 12:05 PM

Increase in Nutritional and Wellness Research: Challenging the Hyper-Thin Female Dancer

CSU 201

This paper focuses on whether an increase in nutritional and wellness research challenges the hyper-thin female ballet dancer. Female ballet dancers are known for being hyper-thin, which implies they do not eat enough. Through research into current literature on nutrition and wellness, as well as by conducting interviews, this paper will argue that there is a need for ballet dancers to be educated in these two areas. This paper will also argue that even through current research has been conducted with regard to dancer nutrition and wellness, and that ballet dancers have access to it, it does not mean they are taking advantage of it. Furthermore, this paper will contend that ballet dancers may think they are eating healthy, but in reality, their caloric and nutritional intake is low. It will conclude that the ballet world needs to change from within and that the need to be hyper-thin has to change in order for ballet dancers to be truly healthy. Dance companies like the St. Paul Ballet are stepping in the right direction by introducing Take Back the Tutu, which is a health and wellness series for dancers.

Recommended Citation

Dreist, Rachel. "Increase in Nutritional and Wellness Research: Challenging the Hyper-Thin Female Dancer." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 11, 2017.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2017/oral-session-05/1