Abstract

As one ages, some degree of cognitive decline is expected. Despite this, declines in cognitive abilities and the possibility of developing dementia are common concerns among older adults. In response to these concerns, a variety of cognitive training programs have been developed that aim to improve or maintain cognitive functioning. Previous literature has shown mixed or limited findings on cognitive changes after implementation of cognitive training. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a cognitive training program designed for older adults with no to minimal cognitive decline. The current study included 19 participants who engaged in two, one-hour long cognitive training classes each week for 12 weeks. Each class required participants to complete activities that targeted the following cognitive domains: attention, visuospatial skills, memory, processing speed, executive functioning, and language. These cognitive domains, along with depression and memory self-efficacy, were assessed prior to and immediately following completion of the program, and at a three-month follow-up. A moderate improvement on global cognitive functioning was observed and small to large improvements were observed on other measures of cognitive functioning. The findings of the current study provide preliminary support for the use of a cognitive training program for healthy older adults.

Advisor

Jeffrey Buchanan

Committee Member

Karla Lassonde

Committee Member

Hsinhuei Sheen Chiou

Date of Degree

2020

Language

english

Document Type

Thesis

Degree

Master of Arts (MA)

Department

Psychology

College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Rights Statements

http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/

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In Copyright