Event Title

Communicative Strategies: Usage and Factors Among People with Severe Aphasia

Streaming Media

Document Type

Event

Professional Biography

Jordyn Ludemann, B.S., is a first-year graduate student studying Communication Disorders at Minnesota State University, Mankato. Throughout her studies she has developed an interest in working with aphasia clients. Her experience includes previous research on severe aphasia, as well as working with MnCAN participants during group and individual therapy sessions.

Elayna Howton, B.S., is a first-year graduate student studying for a Master of Science degree in Communication Disorders at Minnesota State University, Mankato. She has had experience in research including people with adult language disorders, and she has been involved with Minnesota Connect Aphasia Now. Her research interests include neurogenic speech disorders and adult language disorders.

Description

The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of compensatory communicative strategies before and after a stroke in people with severe aphasia (PWSA) and the factors that affect the use of these strategies. Data analysis was conducted from the Assessment for Living with Aphasia-Revised, and the Western Aphasia Battery-Revised. The results indicated that PWSA report both increasing and decreasing amounts of communicative strategies used, as well as the type of strategies used from pre-stroke to post-stroke. The results indicated that the language abilities of people with aphasia are highly variable, although there may be a relationship between positive and negative life participation scores and reporting use of communicative strategies. In conclusion, language and life participation scores in people with severe aphasia vary greatly from person to person.

Keywords

aphasia, severe, life participation, strategies

Degree

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Speech, Hearing, and Rehabilitation Services

College

Allied Health and Nursing

First Faculty Advisor's Name

H. Sheen Chiou

First Faculty Advisor's Department

Speech, Hearing, and Rehabilitation Services

First Faculty Advisor's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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May 15th, 12:00 AM May 15th, 12:00 AM

Communicative Strategies: Usage and Factors Among People with Severe Aphasia

The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of compensatory communicative strategies before and after a stroke in people with severe aphasia (PWSA) and the factors that affect the use of these strategies. Data analysis was conducted from the Assessment for Living with Aphasia-Revised, and the Western Aphasia Battery-Revised. The results indicated that PWSA report both increasing and decreasing amounts of communicative strategies used, as well as the type of strategies used from pre-stroke to post-stroke. The results indicated that the language abilities of people with aphasia are highly variable, although there may be a relationship between positive and negative life participation scores and reporting use of communicative strategies. In conclusion, language and life participation scores in people with severe aphasia vary greatly from person to person.