Event Title

The Moral Dimensions of Juror Deliberation in Death Penalty Cases

Location

CSU 204

Start Date

30-3-2018 11:00 AM

End Date

30-3-2018 12:00 PM

Description

Researchers have been studying capital jurors for decades. We know that white, conservative, fundamentalist males are more likely than other groups to favor the death penalty, but very little is known about why this is the case. This study examines the utility of moral foundations theory (a theory of moral judgment) in explaining how jurors make sentencing decisions in death penalty cases. Moral foundations theory expands upon traditional dimensions of moral judgment (fairness/justice, care/harm) by asserting that loyal, sanctimonious, and respectful acts can be perceived as morally praiseworthy. Results from a large survey experiment highlight the predictive and theoretical utility of individual morality as well as the arbitrary nature of sentencing decisions.

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Mar 30th, 11:00 AM Mar 30th, 12:00 PM

The Moral Dimensions of Juror Deliberation in Death Penalty Cases

CSU 204

Researchers have been studying capital jurors for decades. We know that white, conservative, fundamentalist males are more likely than other groups to favor the death penalty, but very little is known about why this is the case. This study examines the utility of moral foundations theory (a theory of moral judgment) in explaining how jurors make sentencing decisions in death penalty cases. Moral foundations theory expands upon traditional dimensions of moral judgment (fairness/justice, care/harm) by asserting that loyal, sanctimonious, and respectful acts can be perceived as morally praiseworthy. Results from a large survey experiment highlight the predictive and theoretical utility of individual morality as well as the arbitrary nature of sentencing decisions.