Event Title

The Relationship Between Tone and Level of Understanding of Written Instructions by Undergraduate Sorority Women

Location

CSU

Student's Major

English

Student's College

Arts and Humanities

Mentor's Name

Kathleen Hurley

Mentor's Department

English

Mentor's College

Arts and Humanities

Description

While instructions have traditionally been written in a professional tone, it is possible that instructions may be better understood if written in a personal tone. Forty undergraduate sorority women of Minnesota State University, Mankato were asked to learn a variety of games. Twenty of the subjects were given instructions written in a personal tone, while the other half were given instructions written in a professional tone. The length of time and number of questions asked by the subjects were measured and recorded. Subjects were then asked to compare both sets of instructions (professional and personal). On a survey later completed by the subjects, the majority responded that they preferred, or would have preferred, the instructions written in a personal tone. Subjects using these instructions took less time and asked fewer questions then subject using the professional set of instructions. The usefulness of the results increases when they are applied to issues of greater concern such as medical research, advertisement and sales, and education.

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The Relationship Between Tone and Level of Understanding of Written Instructions by Undergraduate Sorority Women

CSU

While instructions have traditionally been written in a professional tone, it is possible that instructions may be better understood if written in a personal tone. Forty undergraduate sorority women of Minnesota State University, Mankato were asked to learn a variety of games. Twenty of the subjects were given instructions written in a personal tone, while the other half were given instructions written in a professional tone. The length of time and number of questions asked by the subjects were measured and recorded. Subjects were then asked to compare both sets of instructions (professional and personal). On a survey later completed by the subjects, the majority responded that they preferred, or would have preferred, the instructions written in a personal tone. Subjects using these instructions took less time and asked fewer questions then subject using the professional set of instructions. The usefulness of the results increases when they are applied to issues of greater concern such as medical research, advertisement and sales, and education.