Event Title

A Comparison of Turn Taking in the Spontaneous Speech of Children with Williams Syndrome and Typically Developing Children

Location

CSU

Student's Major

Speech, Hearing, and Rehabilitation Services

Student's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Mentor's Name

Patricia Hargrove

Mentor's Department

Speech, Hearing, and Rehabilitation Services

Mentor's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Description

Williams Syndrome is a genetic disorder accompanied by developmental delay. Children with Williams Syndrome are considered more talkative than typically developing children. However, much of the evidence for this claim is based on parental reports rather than on empirical research. Therefore, the purpose of this project is to answer the question "Are children with Williams Syndrome more talkative?" Using audiotapes from the Speech and Hearing Clinic, six children with Williams Syndrome and six children whose language is typically developing will be studied. The children's spontaneous speech samples will be analyzed using a computerized language system (SALT). Based on claims in the literature, it is expected that the Williams Syndrome subjects will dominate conversations more than typically developing subjects. Such findings would support the view that children with Williams Syndrome are very talkative.

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A Comparison of Turn Taking in the Spontaneous Speech of Children with Williams Syndrome and Typically Developing Children

CSU

Williams Syndrome is a genetic disorder accompanied by developmental delay. Children with Williams Syndrome are considered more talkative than typically developing children. However, much of the evidence for this claim is based on parental reports rather than on empirical research. Therefore, the purpose of this project is to answer the question "Are children with Williams Syndrome more talkative?" Using audiotapes from the Speech and Hearing Clinic, six children with Williams Syndrome and six children whose language is typically developing will be studied. The children's spontaneous speech samples will be analyzed using a computerized language system (SALT). Based on claims in the literature, it is expected that the Williams Syndrome subjects will dominate conversations more than typically developing subjects. Such findings would support the view that children with Williams Syndrome are very talkative.