Event Title

Japan and the U.S.: Two Free Nations, Two Versions of Free Press

Location

CSU 284

Start Date

24-4-2006 10:30 AM

End Date

24-4-2006 12:30 PM

Student's Major

Communication Studies

Student's College

Arts and Humanities

Mentor's Name

Eiji Kawabata

Mentor's Department

Government

Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Description

The media are important in a democracy; they provide a means of communication between the government and its constituents. They also serve as a fourth branch to check the country's government. Although these two nations have different histories there are many similarities in the media systems. This presentation examines the media and politics in two separate democratic nations, Japan and the United States. Despite their different historical and cultural backgrounds, they have similarities. Both nations have free press, but there are cases when both governmental systems have attempted to censure their media in one form or another. This presentation delves into the differences as well, for instance the Japanese system is more exclusive than the Untied States'. While analyzing the similar and diverse aspects of the media systems the presentation touches on the benefits and the disadvantages of both systems. Through these analyses, the presentation illuminates the fundamental relationship between the media and democracy.

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Apr 24th, 10:30 AM Apr 24th, 12:30 PM

Japan and the U.S.: Two Free Nations, Two Versions of Free Press

CSU 284

The media are important in a democracy; they provide a means of communication between the government and its constituents. They also serve as a fourth branch to check the country's government. Although these two nations have different histories there are many similarities in the media systems. This presentation examines the media and politics in two separate democratic nations, Japan and the United States. Despite their different historical and cultural backgrounds, they have similarities. Both nations have free press, but there are cases when both governmental systems have attempted to censure their media in one form or another. This presentation delves into the differences as well, for instance the Japanese system is more exclusive than the Untied States'. While analyzing the similar and diverse aspects of the media systems the presentation touches on the benefits and the disadvantages of both systems. Through these analyses, the presentation illuminates the fundamental relationship between the media and democracy.

Recommended Citation

Koch, Eliza. "Japan and the U.S.: Two Free Nations, Two Versions of Free Press." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 24, 2006.
https://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2006/oral-session-C/2