Event Title

Graduate Assistant Mistreatment: Students or Employees?

Location

CSU 204

Start Date

24-4-2006 1:30 PM

End Date

24-4-2006 3:00 PM

Student's Major

Communication Studies

Student's College

Arts and Humanities

Mentor's Name

Brian Klosa

Mentor's Department

Communication Studies

Mentor's College

Arts and Humanities

Description

In 2005 there were over two hundred and sixty thousand Graduate Assistants, or OAs in the United States. Graduate Assistants accepted positions as GAs hoping to gain valuable experience in the educational setting, but find out that when they leave universities they leave with massive debt and without the skills needed to succeed outside of academia. In a study of Graduate [Assistant] Treatment referenced in the July, 2005 edition of Physics Today, abuse and exploitation were commonly used to describe GA treatment. The article concluded, "when abuse has become habitual and acceptable, then it is no longer perceived as unethical. Instead, it is perceived as business as usual." GAs have been systematically abused in the academic setting, without a vehicle to change their situation. In an attempt to give graduate assistants the rights they deserve, the problems with the current system must first be identified, then the causes must be understood, before finally discussion solutions to ensure these workers can attempt to receive fair treatment.

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Apr 24th, 1:30 PM Apr 24th, 3:00 PM

Graduate Assistant Mistreatment: Students or Employees?

CSU 204

In 2005 there were over two hundred and sixty thousand Graduate Assistants, or OAs in the United States. Graduate Assistants accepted positions as GAs hoping to gain valuable experience in the educational setting, but find out that when they leave universities they leave with massive debt and without the skills needed to succeed outside of academia. In a study of Graduate [Assistant] Treatment referenced in the July, 2005 edition of Physics Today, abuse and exploitation were commonly used to describe GA treatment. The article concluded, "when abuse has become habitual and acceptable, then it is no longer perceived as unethical. Instead, it is perceived as business as usual." GAs have been systematically abused in the academic setting, without a vehicle to change their situation. In an attempt to give graduate assistants the rights they deserve, the problems with the current system must first be identified, then the causes must be understood, before finally discussion solutions to ensure these workers can attempt to receive fair treatment.

Recommended Citation

Randall, Joshua. "Graduate Assistant Mistreatment: Students or Employees?." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 24, 2006.
https://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2006/oral-session-F/5