Event Title

Inhabition of Cattail Germination by Interspecific and Intraspecific Cattail Root Extracts

Location

CSU 284A

Start Date

5-4-2010 1:00 PM

End Date

5-4-2010 3:00 PM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Bradley Cook

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Three species of cattails are common in the upper Midwest. Typha latifolia is native to North America, T. angustafolia is an exotic species introduced from Eurasia, and T. x glauca is a hybrid between T. latifolia and T. angustafolia. Typha angustifolia and T. x glauca are invasive species that are reducing the biological diversity of many wetlands in southern Minnesota and have become difficult to manage. Individuals of each species produce ~250,000 seeds each year but preliminary genetic profiles of cattail communities suggest that each species primarily reproduces clonally through rhizomes. Therefore, seeds are not effective locally and invasive clonal reproduction suggests that a strong competitive mechanism is at work. Some research suggests that T. latifolia releases auto-toxic root exudates that inhibit germination of conspecifics and T. angustafolia has a similar allelopathic effect on native heterospecifics. Here we tested the effects of cattail root extracts on cattail germination for all interspecific and intraspecific combinations and using deionized water as a control in bioassays. From field observations T. latifolia has the fewest conspecific neighbors and T. x glauca has the fewest heterospecific neighbors. We predict that T. latifolia will have the strongest inhibitory effect on the germination of conspecifics and T. x glauca will have the strongest inhibitory effect on the germination of heterospecifics.

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Apr 5th, 1:00 PM Apr 5th, 3:00 PM

Inhabition of Cattail Germination by Interspecific and Intraspecific Cattail Root Extracts

CSU 284A

Three species of cattails are common in the upper Midwest. Typha latifolia is native to North America, T. angustafolia is an exotic species introduced from Eurasia, and T. x glauca is a hybrid between T. latifolia and T. angustafolia. Typha angustifolia and T. x glauca are invasive species that are reducing the biological diversity of many wetlands in southern Minnesota and have become difficult to manage. Individuals of each species produce ~250,000 seeds each year but preliminary genetic profiles of cattail communities suggest that each species primarily reproduces clonally through rhizomes. Therefore, seeds are not effective locally and invasive clonal reproduction suggests that a strong competitive mechanism is at work. Some research suggests that T. latifolia releases auto-toxic root exudates that inhibit germination of conspecifics and T. angustafolia has a similar allelopathic effect on native heterospecifics. Here we tested the effects of cattail root extracts on cattail germination for all interspecific and intraspecific combinations and using deionized water as a control in bioassays. From field observations T. latifolia has the fewest conspecific neighbors and T. x glauca has the fewest heterospecific neighbors. We predict that T. latifolia will have the strongest inhibitory effect on the germination of conspecifics and T. x glauca will have the strongest inhibitory effect on the germination of heterospecifics.

Recommended Citation

Beal, Lauren. "Inhabition of Cattail Germination by Interspecific and Intraspecific Cattail Root Extracts." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 5, 2010.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2010/oral-session-06/2