Event Title

Small Engines Team

Location

CSU 204

Start Date

9-4-2012 1:00 PM

End Date

9-4-2012 2:00 PM

Student's Major

Automotive and Manufacturing Engineering Technology

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Gary Mead

Mentor's Department

Automotive and Manufacturing Engineering Technology

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

In August 2013 all Minnesota gas pumps will be required to have gasoline containing 20% ethanol, compared to 10% at the moment. This research study focused on the effect of mid-level ethanol blends on small non-road engines. Currently, almost all non-road engines are rated only for 10% ethanol, or E10 fuel. The study will aid manufacturers and the EPA in predicting the effects of mid- level ethanol blends in small engines. This change could result in small engines having shorter life spans and diminished performance.

This study tested leaf blowers and weed whackers. They were tested in E0, E10, E15 and E20 (% Ethanol content). There were two engines using the same fuel, four fuels, thus 8 engines per test. The engines had tests performed on them to determine the position they will be able to run, such as upside down, pointed up, etc. Each engine was aged 125 hours as per the manufacturer’s specifications with tests conducted at the two hour break in, 62.5 hour half life, and 125 hour marks. The engines were operated at an interval of 2:20 minutes wide open throttle, and 0:20 minutes idle. The engines were loaded with the attachments they were intended to be used with. Temperature measurements at six different points of the engine were monitored to ensure accurate representations of the effects each fuel has on the engines. The data collected was instrumental in the future of small non-road engines and how they perform with E20, as well as natural resource sustainment.

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Apr 9th, 1:00 PM Apr 9th, 2:00 PM

Small Engines Team

CSU 204

In August 2013 all Minnesota gas pumps will be required to have gasoline containing 20% ethanol, compared to 10% at the moment. This research study focused on the effect of mid-level ethanol blends on small non-road engines. Currently, almost all non-road engines are rated only for 10% ethanol, or E10 fuel. The study will aid manufacturers and the EPA in predicting the effects of mid- level ethanol blends in small engines. This change could result in small engines having shorter life spans and diminished performance.

This study tested leaf blowers and weed whackers. They were tested in E0, E10, E15 and E20 (% Ethanol content). There were two engines using the same fuel, four fuels, thus 8 engines per test. The engines had tests performed on them to determine the position they will be able to run, such as upside down, pointed up, etc. Each engine was aged 125 hours as per the manufacturer’s specifications with tests conducted at the two hour break in, 62.5 hour half life, and 125 hour marks. The engines were operated at an interval of 2:20 minutes wide open throttle, and 0:20 minutes idle. The engines were loaded with the attachments they were intended to be used with. Temperature measurements at six different points of the engine were monitored to ensure accurate representations of the effects each fuel has on the engines. The data collected was instrumental in the future of small non-road engines and how they perform with E20, as well as natural resource sustainment.

Recommended Citation

Olson, Ryan. "Small Engines Team." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 9, 2012.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2012/oral-session-09/3