Event Title

Effects of Flocculent on Storm Water Sediment Detention

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

9-4-2012 10:00 AM

End Date

9-4-2012 11:30 AM

Student's Major

Mechanical and Civil Engineering

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Stephen Druschel

Mentor's Department

Mechanical and Civil Engineering

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Pollutants slowly build up on the surface of the earth either through direct human action, or natural processes. Our main concern in this research is where the pollutants go after a significant rain event. Much of the time they are washed to a creek or a stream where they remain in suspended solution until the solution runs into a detention pond. Here, they are supposed to be filtered out of the water column before flowing into the major bodies of water we rely on for drinking water and recreation. During heavy rain fall, the detention ponds do not work as they should, and the water has no time to let gravity alone work effectively against the pollutants. We suggest during peak rain events, injecting a flocculent into the water before the detention pond to effectively settle out pollutants. This could essentially be used to improve the clarity and quality of the source water we use for drinking and recreation, and reduce the cost of treatment; at the same time improving the ecology of the water, enhancing the enjoyment of fishing, swimming, canoeing, etc. Our method will involve collecting soil samples from all over Minnesota, getting as diverse of samples as possible. In 1000mL graduated cylinders, we will mix the sample well with water, and allow only gravity to settle it out of the control. We will then test different concentrations of multiple commercially available flocculants in two more graduated cylinders, one of them having had the pH balanced before treatment. If implemented correctly under real world conditions, we expect flocculent to be very useful in settling out suspended pollutants in storm water run-off. Our research could be used as a jumping off point for individuals concerned with pollutants in run-off water, to help with implementation and correct dosage of storm water.

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Apr 9th, 10:00 AM Apr 9th, 11:30 AM

Effects of Flocculent on Storm Water Sediment Detention

CSU Ballroom

Pollutants slowly build up on the surface of the earth either through direct human action, or natural processes. Our main concern in this research is where the pollutants go after a significant rain event. Much of the time they are washed to a creek or a stream where they remain in suspended solution until the solution runs into a detention pond. Here, they are supposed to be filtered out of the water column before flowing into the major bodies of water we rely on for drinking water and recreation. During heavy rain fall, the detention ponds do not work as they should, and the water has no time to let gravity alone work effectively against the pollutants. We suggest during peak rain events, injecting a flocculent into the water before the detention pond to effectively settle out pollutants. This could essentially be used to improve the clarity and quality of the source water we use for drinking and recreation, and reduce the cost of treatment; at the same time improving the ecology of the water, enhancing the enjoyment of fishing, swimming, canoeing, etc. Our method will involve collecting soil samples from all over Minnesota, getting as diverse of samples as possible. In 1000mL graduated cylinders, we will mix the sample well with water, and allow only gravity to settle it out of the control. We will then test different concentrations of multiple commercially available flocculants in two more graduated cylinders, one of them having had the pH balanced before treatment. If implemented correctly under real world conditions, we expect flocculent to be very useful in settling out suspended pollutants in storm water run-off. Our research could be used as a jumping off point for individuals concerned with pollutants in run-off water, to help with implementation and correct dosage of storm water.

Recommended Citation

Schimmel, Jerry; Chase Radue; Nripendra Bastola; Hyunjung Lee; and Akinola Asaolu. "Effects of Flocculent on Storm Water Sediment Detention." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 9, 2012.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2012/poster-session-A/37