Event Title

Does a Capeweed Population from San Francisco Have Allelopathic Ability?

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

9-4-2012 10:00 AM

End Date

9-4-2012 11:30 AM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Beth Proctor

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Originally from South Africa, Capeweed (Arctotheca prostrata) was introduced into the United States as ornamental plant. Capeweed is an invasive species and has the potential to invade large parts of California. Greenhouse plants from a Capeweed population collected in San Francisco (Tennessee Valley) were grown and used for this experiment. The purpose of this research was to determine if water extracts of leaves, and roots of this population reduced the germination and or growth of lettuce seeds (Latuca sativa). Roots and leaves were separated and ground with a ball pestle grinder. Then HPLC water was added to different wet weights of the roots or leaves, mixed using a vortex mixer for 5 minutes, centrifuged and then 10 mls of the extract was added to individual Petri dishes containing 10 lettuce seeds. The Petri dishes were incubated at 26oC (10 hrs/14 hrs dark) for 72 hours. When compared with controls, there was no significant difference in the number of seeds that germinated. The water extract of the 2.5 grams of leaf had a germination rate lower than the controls. There were appreciable differences in growth of the lettuce as measured by root length for all weight of leaves and 4 gram wet weight of roots. There were no runners on this population. Water soluble chemicals leaching from the plant or from the decomposition of these plants may release chemicals that provide a competitive edge for this plant . More research is needed.

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Apr 9th, 10:00 AM Apr 9th, 11:30 AM

Does a Capeweed Population from San Francisco Have Allelopathic Ability?

CSU Ballroom

Originally from South Africa, Capeweed (Arctotheca prostrata) was introduced into the United States as ornamental plant. Capeweed is an invasive species and has the potential to invade large parts of California. Greenhouse plants from a Capeweed population collected in San Francisco (Tennessee Valley) were grown and used for this experiment. The purpose of this research was to determine if water extracts of leaves, and roots of this population reduced the germination and or growth of lettuce seeds (Latuca sativa). Roots and leaves were separated and ground with a ball pestle grinder. Then HPLC water was added to different wet weights of the roots or leaves, mixed using a vortex mixer for 5 minutes, centrifuged and then 10 mls of the extract was added to individual Petri dishes containing 10 lettuce seeds. The Petri dishes were incubated at 26oC (10 hrs/14 hrs dark) for 72 hours. When compared with controls, there was no significant difference in the number of seeds that germinated. The water extract of the 2.5 grams of leaf had a germination rate lower than the controls. There were appreciable differences in growth of the lettuce as measured by root length for all weight of leaves and 4 gram wet weight of roots. There were no runners on this population. Water soluble chemicals leaching from the plant or from the decomposition of these plants may release chemicals that provide a competitive edge for this plant . More research is needed.

Recommended Citation

Gruber, Dustin. "Does a Capeweed Population from San Francisco Have Allelopathic Ability?." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 9, 2012.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2012/poster-session-A/42