Event Title

School Violence in Russian Federation

Location

CSU 253

Start Date

16-4-2013 11:10 AM

End Date

16-4-2013 12:10 PM

Student's Major

Elementary and Early Childhood Education

Student's College

Education

Mentor's Name

Elizabeth Sandell

Mentor's Department

Elementary and Early Childhood Education

Mentor's College

Education

Description

The problem of violence and aggression within the schools has attracted the attention of North Americans for many years. However, recent reports appear to indicate that such violence is even more prevalent and severe than in the past. An analysis of psychological and pedagogical literature showed that school bullying is considered in the modern world as a serious social and pedagogical problem.

Violence at school includes bullying, physical or psychological terror, aiming to cause another fear and thereby control [Kon, 2006]. Ozhieva [2013] has divided school violence into physical school bullying (intentional kicks, punches, blows and other bodily injuries, etc.) and psychological school bullying (related violence, effect on the psyche, and psychological trauma). The consequences of violence in school, according to Pronina [2008] include: (1) loss of self-esteem and feeling intimidated; (2) neurotic disorders, depression, disturbance of sleep and appetite; and (3) thoughts about suicide. Despite the serious consequences of bullying, the scientific literature and research in Russia has focused very little on school-based violence in Russia. This research will report on a survey of recent graduates of School Number 29, Magadan, Russia. Results indicated that local students were very aggressive towards each other, and rated high on scales of verbal aggression, physical aggression, and negativism. Data analysis revealed that adolescents often have to deal with violence directed toward self and directed towards other people. Almost all respondents expressed their understanding that violence is unacceptable and causes negative consequences. However, the teenagers reported that they felt unprotected and unsure where to seek help.

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Apr 16th, 11:10 AM Apr 16th, 12:10 PM

School Violence in Russian Federation

CSU 253

The problem of violence and aggression within the schools has attracted the attention of North Americans for many years. However, recent reports appear to indicate that such violence is even more prevalent and severe than in the past. An analysis of psychological and pedagogical literature showed that school bullying is considered in the modern world as a serious social and pedagogical problem.

Violence at school includes bullying, physical or psychological terror, aiming to cause another fear and thereby control [Kon, 2006]. Ozhieva [2013] has divided school violence into physical school bullying (intentional kicks, punches, blows and other bodily injuries, etc.) and psychological school bullying (related violence, effect on the psyche, and psychological trauma). The consequences of violence in school, according to Pronina [2008] include: (1) loss of self-esteem and feeling intimidated; (2) neurotic disorders, depression, disturbance of sleep and appetite; and (3) thoughts about suicide. Despite the serious consequences of bullying, the scientific literature and research in Russia has focused very little on school-based violence in Russia. This research will report on a survey of recent graduates of School Number 29, Magadan, Russia. Results indicated that local students were very aggressive towards each other, and rated high on scales of verbal aggression, physical aggression, and negativism. Data analysis revealed that adolescents often have to deal with violence directed toward self and directed towards other people. Almost all respondents expressed their understanding that violence is unacceptable and causes negative consequences. However, the teenagers reported that they felt unprotected and unsure where to seek help.

Recommended Citation

Pestereva, Olga. "School Violence in Russian Federation." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 16, 2013.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2013/oral-session-08/2