Event Title

MSU Student Knowledge of Gender Diversity

Location

CSU 204

Start Date

16-4-2013 3:25 PM

End Date

16-4-2013 4:25 PM

Student's Major

Gender and Women's Studies

Student's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Mentor's Name

Shannon Miller

Mentor's Department

Gender and Women's Studies

Mentor's College

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Description

Knowledge and acceptance of gender-variant individuals is essential on college campuses in order to increase equality for all students. This inclusion begins by recognizing the presence of more than two genders – more than just male and female college students. For this research study, we examined Minnesota State University, Mankato students’ knowledge and awareness of gender diversity.

Preliminary findings suggest that most respondents both believe there are only two genders as well as have a general concept of what transgender means. Only one respondent correctly defined cis-gender (someone whose self-perception of their own gender matches their birth biological sex). A small percentage of respondents used transphobic language in response to the questions. When asked about how to increase education and visibility of gender diversity topics on our campus, many participants suggested more awareness, posters, classes, activities, clubs, campaigns and open forums. Participants thus far have been between 18 and 30 years old, primarily white, and heterosexual; more data collection is necessary and currently ongoing. This study has implications for aiding our university in best educating students in the future about gender diversity. Education on this topic will only increase inclusivity of gender variant individuals and therefore improve the campus climate.

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Apr 16th, 3:25 PM Apr 16th, 4:25 PM

MSU Student Knowledge of Gender Diversity

CSU 204

Knowledge and acceptance of gender-variant individuals is essential on college campuses in order to increase equality for all students. This inclusion begins by recognizing the presence of more than two genders – more than just male and female college students. For this research study, we examined Minnesota State University, Mankato students’ knowledge and awareness of gender diversity.

Preliminary findings suggest that most respondents both believe there are only two genders as well as have a general concept of what transgender means. Only one respondent correctly defined cis-gender (someone whose self-perception of their own gender matches their birth biological sex). A small percentage of respondents used transphobic language in response to the questions. When asked about how to increase education and visibility of gender diversity topics on our campus, many participants suggested more awareness, posters, classes, activities, clubs, campaigns and open forums. Participants thus far have been between 18 and 30 years old, primarily white, and heterosexual; more data collection is necessary and currently ongoing. This study has implications for aiding our university in best educating students in the future about gender diversity. Education on this topic will only increase inclusivity of gender variant individuals and therefore improve the campus climate.

Recommended Citation

Babcock, Meghan; Nicole Gartner; and Anastasia Nereson. "MSU Student Knowledge of Gender Diversity." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 16, 2013.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2013/oral-session-16/3