Event Title

The Effect of Artificial Sweeteners on Overeating and Weight Gain

Location

CSU 254

Start Date

21-4-2014 1:05 PM

End Date

21-4-2014 2:05 PM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

David Bissonnette

Mentor's Email Address

david.bissonnette@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Family Consumer Science

Mentor's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Second Mentor's Name

Penny Knolich

Second Mentor's Email Address

penny.knoblich@mnsu.edu

Second Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Second Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

The effectiveness of artificial sweeteners as a therapeutic strategy for weight control has been questioned. Artificial sweeteners added to food and beverages are believed to drive significant overeating. Consumption of non-calorie sweeteners (NNS) correlates with the incidence of obesity, Type II diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that rats consuming NNS added to a liquid diet (Osmolite Abbott Labs) will over consume both total volume of diet and calories. Method: After 3 days of acclimatization to the liquid diet, rats were randomly assigned to one of 4 experimental groups: Osmolite Standard, Osmolite+sucrose (15%), Osmolite + Stevia(0.1%), Osmolite+Saccharin (0.2%) and followed for seven weeks. Another set of rats were randomly allocated to 4 experimental groups: After 3 weeks of consuming Osmolite with two possible NNS ( 0.1% stevia, and 0.2% saccharin) or two standard Osmolite diets, the rats were switched to sugar for one week, then given either a NNS or standard Osmolite for 2 weeks. On the 7th week, all rats were fed a standard Osmolite diet. Results: Sugar added to the liquid diet caused a significant 42.46% decline in volume of diet consumed, but the calories consumed were not different. When sugar was replaced by the NNS or by no sweetener, rats consumed 33.73% more volume, but 16.97% less calories regardless whether they consumed NNS or no sugar diet. Conclusions: There is no evidence supporting the notion that eating NNS either over the long period or after sugar consumption causes either increased caloric consumption or increased body weight gain.

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Apr 21st, 1:05 PM Apr 21st, 2:05 PM

The Effect of Artificial Sweeteners on Overeating and Weight Gain

CSU 254

The effectiveness of artificial sweeteners as a therapeutic strategy for weight control has been questioned. Artificial sweeteners added to food and beverages are believed to drive significant overeating. Consumption of non-calorie sweeteners (NNS) correlates with the incidence of obesity, Type II diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that rats consuming NNS added to a liquid diet (Osmolite Abbott Labs) will over consume both total volume of diet and calories. Method: After 3 days of acclimatization to the liquid diet, rats were randomly assigned to one of 4 experimental groups: Osmolite Standard, Osmolite+sucrose (15%), Osmolite + Stevia(0.1%), Osmolite+Saccharin (0.2%) and followed for seven weeks. Another set of rats were randomly allocated to 4 experimental groups: After 3 weeks of consuming Osmolite with two possible NNS ( 0.1% stevia, and 0.2% saccharin) or two standard Osmolite diets, the rats were switched to sugar for one week, then given either a NNS or standard Osmolite for 2 weeks. On the 7th week, all rats were fed a standard Osmolite diet. Results: Sugar added to the liquid diet caused a significant 42.46% decline in volume of diet consumed, but the calories consumed were not different. When sugar was replaced by the NNS or by no sweetener, rats consumed 33.73% more volume, but 16.97% less calories regardless whether they consumed NNS or no sugar diet. Conclusions: There is no evidence supporting the notion that eating NNS either over the long period or after sugar consumption causes either increased caloric consumption or increased body weight gain.

Recommended Citation

Collins, Christopher; Samantha List; Ivy Hakala; and Shelby Johnson. "The Effect of Artificial Sweeteners on Overeating and Weight Gain." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 21, 2014.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2014/oral_session_08/2