Event Title

Methods to Reduce Bacteria on Lettuce

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

21-4-2014 10:00 AM

End Date

21-4-2014 11:30 AM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Dorothy Wrigley

Mentor's Email Address

dorothy.wrigley@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Lettuce is a minimally processed food with a short shelf life for both grocers and consumers. Three treatments were tested for their ability to decrease spoilage bacteria populations on the lettuce. The effectiveness of the electrolyzed water, U.V light treatment and traditional bleach water wash were compared to regular tap water wash. The spread plating technique was used to determine the concentration (CFU/g) of bacteria. Each treatment was done for 0, 10 and 20 seconds. The bleach and U.V treatments were 40 and 3 times more effective than the tap water wash respectively. The bleach treatment is very effective but also may affect consumer health. To determine effectiveness of electrolyzed water, the lettuce leaf is washed in the generated electrolyzed water and CFU/g is determined. The process is still ongoing, in search of the correct time increments and solution concentration needed for maximum effectiveness. However, initial trials show that 20 seconds was not effective. If this method can be modified to be successful, this could introduce a safer produce wash alternative to bleach.

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Apr 21st, 10:00 AM Apr 21st, 11:30 AM

Methods to Reduce Bacteria on Lettuce

CSU Ballroom

Lettuce is a minimally processed food with a short shelf life for both grocers and consumers. Three treatments were tested for their ability to decrease spoilage bacteria populations on the lettuce. The effectiveness of the electrolyzed water, U.V light treatment and traditional bleach water wash were compared to regular tap water wash. The spread plating technique was used to determine the concentration (CFU/g) of bacteria. Each treatment was done for 0, 10 and 20 seconds. The bleach and U.V treatments were 40 and 3 times more effective than the tap water wash respectively. The bleach treatment is very effective but also may affect consumer health. To determine effectiveness of electrolyzed water, the lettuce leaf is washed in the generated electrolyzed water and CFU/g is determined. The process is still ongoing, in search of the correct time increments and solution concentration needed for maximum effectiveness. However, initial trials show that 20 seconds was not effective. If this method can be modified to be successful, this could introduce a safer produce wash alternative to bleach.

Recommended Citation

Bhandari, Pradeep and Eric Hermansen. "Methods to Reduce Bacteria on Lettuce." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 21, 2014.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2014/poster_session_A/4