Event Title

Unter den Linden: A Look into German Identity

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

21-4-2014 2:00 PM

End Date

21-4-2014 3:30 PM

Student's Major

World Languages and Cultures

Student's College

Arts and Humanities

Mentor's Name

Nadja Kramer

Mentor's Email Address

nadja.kramer@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

World Languages and Cultures

Mentor's College

Arts and Humanities

Description

In the historical heart of Berlin there is a famous boulevard called Unter den Linden that reflects the diversity of German history. Originally, the linden trees were planted in the mid seventeenth century by Duke Fredrick Wilhelm to help beautify Berlin as well as the paved walk from his palace to the Tiergarten (literally garden of animals) where he hunted. During World War II Hitler tore down many of the trees, which he later had replanted. Damage from World War II left buildings in ruins; they remained, despite their prominent location in the East Berlin, which became the East German capital in 1949. Only after German reunification in 1990 and Berlin was reunified, the area saw some redevelopment. Some historical landmarks were left, others were destroyed and rebuilt. A range of questions arise in the course of the history of the boulevard that reflects on Germany’s self-representation: Why would the linden tree be chosen to line the famous boulevard over the more Germanic oak tree? Why did the East German government leave this area in ruins instead of rebuilding? What guided the reconstruction of Unter den Linden? In summary, my research will look at the question as to why this boulevard Unter den Linden and its adjacent buildings and landmarks (new and old) have taken on such prominence in German national identity. My research into this project will be aided by the findings that I collect as part of a faculty-led MSU Study Abroad Tour during spring break 2014.

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Apr 21st, 2:00 PM Apr 21st, 3:30 PM

Unter den Linden: A Look into German Identity

CSU Ballroom

In the historical heart of Berlin there is a famous boulevard called Unter den Linden that reflects the diversity of German history. Originally, the linden trees were planted in the mid seventeenth century by Duke Fredrick Wilhelm to help beautify Berlin as well as the paved walk from his palace to the Tiergarten (literally garden of animals) where he hunted. During World War II Hitler tore down many of the trees, which he later had replanted. Damage from World War II left buildings in ruins; they remained, despite their prominent location in the East Berlin, which became the East German capital in 1949. Only after German reunification in 1990 and Berlin was reunified, the area saw some redevelopment. Some historical landmarks were left, others were destroyed and rebuilt. A range of questions arise in the course of the history of the boulevard that reflects on Germany’s self-representation: Why would the linden tree be chosen to line the famous boulevard over the more Germanic oak tree? Why did the East German government leave this area in ruins instead of rebuilding? What guided the reconstruction of Unter den Linden? In summary, my research will look at the question as to why this boulevard Unter den Linden and its adjacent buildings and landmarks (new and old) have taken on such prominence in German national identity. My research into this project will be aided by the findings that I collect as part of a faculty-led MSU Study Abroad Tour during spring break 2014.

Recommended Citation

Friedrichs, Daniel. "Unter den Linden: A Look into German Identity." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 21, 2014.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2014/poster_session_B/44