Event Title

Identifying the Functional Role of EXC-1, a GTPase Required for Maintenance of Shape in Small Biological Tubes

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

20-4-2015 10:00 AM

End Date

20-4-2015 11:30 AM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Kelly Grussendorf

Mentor's Email Address

kelly.grussendorf@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Biological tubes require regular maintenance due to constant pressures exerted on them. Selfrepairing mechanisms that occur on the subcellular level are essential to the longevity and growth of the tubule shape. Loss of this structure has been shown to result in a number of different disorders such as Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD). PKD is characterized by loss structure in the nephrons of the kidney, resulting in the formation of fluid-filled cysts associated complications. To gain a better understanding of the cellular mechanisms that underlie these repairing processes, we study the genetic model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. C. elegans contains many small tubules like those found in the vascular and renal systems of humans. The tube that we study is the excretory canal, which is made up of a single epithelial tube cell; this provides a simple cellular and genetic model to carry out tests. Members of the EXC family of proteins are essential for growth and consistent maintenance of the shape of the excretory canal. Mutations in the exc (EXcretory Canal abnormal) genes lose the ability to maintain proper structure and develop cystic abnormalities. One gene in this family, exc-1, encodes a homologue of the Immunity-Related GTPases (IRGP), which plays a role in membrane trafficking, autophagy and endosome formation in mammalian cells. Continuing this work, we want to gain conclusive evidence that exc-1 is in fact a functional GTPase by the creation of a transgenic vector, isolation of the protein, and then carrying out a biochemical assay to test our hypothesis.

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Apr 20th, 10:00 AM Apr 20th, 11:30 AM

Identifying the Functional Role of EXC-1, a GTPase Required for Maintenance of Shape in Small Biological Tubes

CSU Ballroom

Biological tubes require regular maintenance due to constant pressures exerted on them. Selfrepairing mechanisms that occur on the subcellular level are essential to the longevity and growth of the tubule shape. Loss of this structure has been shown to result in a number of different disorders such as Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD). PKD is characterized by loss structure in the nephrons of the kidney, resulting in the formation of fluid-filled cysts associated complications. To gain a better understanding of the cellular mechanisms that underlie these repairing processes, we study the genetic model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. C. elegans contains many small tubules like those found in the vascular and renal systems of humans. The tube that we study is the excretory canal, which is made up of a single epithelial tube cell; this provides a simple cellular and genetic model to carry out tests. Members of the EXC family of proteins are essential for growth and consistent maintenance of the shape of the excretory canal. Mutations in the exc (EXcretory Canal abnormal) genes lose the ability to maintain proper structure and develop cystic abnormalities. One gene in this family, exc-1, encodes a homologue of the Immunity-Related GTPases (IRGP), which plays a role in membrane trafficking, autophagy and endosome formation in mammalian cells. Continuing this work, we want to gain conclusive evidence that exc-1 is in fact a functional GTPase by the creation of a transgenic vector, isolation of the protein, and then carrying out a biochemical assay to test our hypothesis.

Recommended Citation

Kampmeyer, Drew. "Identifying the Functional Role of EXC-1, a GTPase Required for Maintenance of Shape in Small Biological Tubes." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 20, 2015.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2015/poster_session_A/19