Event Title

Narrative Skills of School-Age Children with Learning Disabilities

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

20-4-2015 2:00 PM

End Date

20-4-2015 3:30 PM

Student's Major

Speech, Hearing, and Rehabilitation Services

Student's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Mentor's Name

Megan Mahowald

Mentor's Email Address

megan.mahowald@mnsu.edu

Mentor's Department

Speech, Hearing, and Rehabilitation Services

Mentor's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Description

Children with learning disabilities often have difficulties with the understanding and use of oral language. Specifically, they may produce incomplete narratives (referring to the ability to tell a story). The ability to tell a complex narrative is positively correlated to reading comprehension abilities and therefore is important to explore with children with disabilities. Narrative samples were collected from 20 3rd grade students, 10 typically developing and 10 students with disabilities. Students also completed a standardized oral language assessment and reading achievement scores were collected. These data were analyzed to determine if a correlation exists between these narrative performances and their standardized language assessment scores. Preliminary findings suggest that when comparing both the narrative evaluations and standardized language assessment scores of typically developing 3rd grade students to those with learning disabilities, the students with learning disabilities typically produced lower scores. Understanding and recognizing this correlation between narrative skills and standardized language assessment scores could aid speech-language pathologists and school practitioners in implementing the necessary and appropriate techniques that will allow for their students to achieve success in the classroom.

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Apr 20th, 2:00 PM Apr 20th, 3:30 PM

Narrative Skills of School-Age Children with Learning Disabilities

CSU Ballroom

Children with learning disabilities often have difficulties with the understanding and use of oral language. Specifically, they may produce incomplete narratives (referring to the ability to tell a story). The ability to tell a complex narrative is positively correlated to reading comprehension abilities and therefore is important to explore with children with disabilities. Narrative samples were collected from 20 3rd grade students, 10 typically developing and 10 students with disabilities. Students also completed a standardized oral language assessment and reading achievement scores were collected. These data were analyzed to determine if a correlation exists between these narrative performances and their standardized language assessment scores. Preliminary findings suggest that when comparing both the narrative evaluations and standardized language assessment scores of typically developing 3rd grade students to those with learning disabilities, the students with learning disabilities typically produced lower scores. Understanding and recognizing this correlation between narrative skills and standardized language assessment scores could aid speech-language pathologists and school practitioners in implementing the necessary and appropriate techniques that will allow for their students to achieve success in the classroom.

Recommended Citation

Doran, Haley. "Narrative Skills of School-Age Children with Learning Disabilities." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 20, 2015.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2015/poster_session_B/1