Event Title

β-Lactam Resistance in Staphylococcus Species Isolated from Students

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

18-4-2016 10:00 AM

End Date

18-4-2016 11:30 AM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Timothy Secott

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

β-lactam antibiotics have been a cornerstone in the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections for decades, but increasing resistance rates threaten to reduce their reliability. Because β-lactam drugs remain one of the major classes of antibiotics, it is imperative to understand the extent of resistance to β-lactams in the population at large. Research has already provided information about the frequency of resistance in hospitalized individuals, but relatively little is known about the likelihood of resistance of Staphylococcus species in asymptomatic, healthy people. By obtaining samples of Staphylococcus species from asymptomatic, student populations, we may gain a more thorough understanding of the distribution and nature of β-lactam resistance. β-lactam resistance is mediated through two pathways, the first being production of β-lactamase, and the second being production of an altered penicillin binding protein (PBP2a), which is controlled by expression of the mecA gene. Each student sample was evaluated for resistance with several different β-lactam drugs, and the mechanism of resistance was tested in both pathways. Analysis of results have shown β-lactam resistance within the student population. These finding support the additional research that exists on β-lactam resistance. Our results were largely as anticipated; however, we now have provided a link between β-lactam resistance mechanisms in symptomatic and asymptomatic populations.

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Apr 18th, 10:00 AM Apr 18th, 11:30 AM

β-Lactam Resistance in Staphylococcus Species Isolated from Students

CSU Ballroom

β-lactam antibiotics have been a cornerstone in the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections for decades, but increasing resistance rates threaten to reduce their reliability. Because β-lactam drugs remain one of the major classes of antibiotics, it is imperative to understand the extent of resistance to β-lactams in the population at large. Research has already provided information about the frequency of resistance in hospitalized individuals, but relatively little is known about the likelihood of resistance of Staphylococcus species in asymptomatic, healthy people. By obtaining samples of Staphylococcus species from asymptomatic, student populations, we may gain a more thorough understanding of the distribution and nature of β-lactam resistance. β-lactam resistance is mediated through two pathways, the first being production of β-lactamase, and the second being production of an altered penicillin binding protein (PBP2a), which is controlled by expression of the mecA gene. Each student sample was evaluated for resistance with several different β-lactam drugs, and the mechanism of resistance was tested in both pathways. Analysis of results have shown β-lactam resistance within the student population. These finding support the additional research that exists on β-lactam resistance. Our results were largely as anticipated; however, we now have provided a link between β-lactam resistance mechanisms in symptomatic and asymptomatic populations.

Recommended Citation

Grund, Laurie. "β-Lactam Resistance in Staphylococcus Species Isolated from Students." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 18, 2016.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2016/poster-session-A/12