Event Title

Ultrastructure of Larval Trematodes from Snails Collected from Lake Winnibigoshish

Location

CSU Ballroom

Start Date

11-4-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

11-4-2017 11:30 AM

Student's Major

Biological Sciences

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Robert Sorensen

Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Second Mentor's Name

Scott Malotka

Second Mentor's Department

Biological Sciences

Second Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Trematodes are a class of parasitic flatworm that are internal parasites of both mollusks and vertebrate hosts. Most trematodes have a complex life cycle that includes at least two hosts: one where sexual reproduction occurs (definitive host) and one where asexual reproduction occurs (intermediate host). Identification of both larval and adult stages is critical for determining the species of trematode in question as well as the mechanisms that allow that parasites to reside within their intermediate host. The current investigation was started to elucidate the mechanisms that allow for parasite attachment within intermediate hosts. Snails were collected from Lake Winnibigoshish in northern Minnesota, an area known for harboring trematode diversity within both definitive and intermediate hosts. During this study, two different larval forms (rediae and tetracotyle) were dissected from snail hosts and prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Examination of the presence or absence of structures used for the attachment to host tissues will be performed. These findings will help better understand the interaction that occurs between the intermediate snail host and the parasitic worm.

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Apr 11th, 10:00 AM Apr 11th, 11:30 AM

Ultrastructure of Larval Trematodes from Snails Collected from Lake Winnibigoshish

CSU Ballroom

Trematodes are a class of parasitic flatworm that are internal parasites of both mollusks and vertebrate hosts. Most trematodes have a complex life cycle that includes at least two hosts: one where sexual reproduction occurs (definitive host) and one where asexual reproduction occurs (intermediate host). Identification of both larval and adult stages is critical for determining the species of trematode in question as well as the mechanisms that allow that parasites to reside within their intermediate host. The current investigation was started to elucidate the mechanisms that allow for parasite attachment within intermediate hosts. Snails were collected from Lake Winnibigoshish in northern Minnesota, an area known for harboring trematode diversity within both definitive and intermediate hosts. During this study, two different larval forms (rediae and tetracotyle) were dissected from snail hosts and prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Examination of the presence or absence of structures used for the attachment to host tissues will be performed. These findings will help better understand the interaction that occurs between the intermediate snail host and the parasitic worm.

Recommended Citation

Iverson, Jacob and Ross Buttleman. "Ultrastructure of Larval Trematodes from Snails Collected from Lake Winnibigoshish." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 11, 2017.
http://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2017/poster-session-A/12