Event Title

Demi-Romantic Non-Binary Pansexual: Learning from Micro-Identities in the Classroom

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Location

Virtual

Start Date

11-9-2020 9:15 AM

End Date

11-9-2020 9:45 AM

Description

About 36% of Minnesota college students identify as non-cisgender or non-heterosexual, and many are embracing gender and sexual identities other than the traditional LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender). Some of these emergent identities are broadly defined (non-binary, pansexual), but most delineate precise patterns of desire, behavior, and belonging. The proliferation of micro-identities requires professors to move far beyond the basics of inclusivity, such as "Don't assume that all students are heterosexual" and "Don't identify a student's gender based on their appearance", to rethink classroom exercises, exam questions, and even subject matter (does it make sense to talk about a wage gap between men and women, when some people identify as neither?). However, micro-identities also allow professors and students a variety of learning opportunities, especially in the social sciences.

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Sep 11th, 9:15 AM Sep 11th, 9:45 AM

Demi-Romantic Non-Binary Pansexual: Learning from Micro-Identities in the Classroom

Virtual

About 36% of Minnesota college students identify as non-cisgender or non-heterosexual, and many are embracing gender and sexual identities other than the traditional LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender). Some of these emergent identities are broadly defined (non-binary, pansexual), but most delineate precise patterns of desire, behavior, and belonging. The proliferation of micro-identities requires professors to move far beyond the basics of inclusivity, such as "Don't assume that all students are heterosexual" and "Don't identify a student's gender based on their appearance", to rethink classroom exercises, exam questions, and even subject matter (does it make sense to talk about a wage gap between men and women, when some people identify as neither?). However, micro-identities also allow professors and students a variety of learning opportunities, especially in the social sciences.