Event Title

Teletherapy and Camp Maverick: Literacy Students and Caregiver's Perspectives

Start Date

15-4-2021 3:30 PM

End Date

15-4-2021 3:45 PM

Student's Major

Speech, Hearing, and Rehabilitation Services

Student's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Mentor's Name

Megan Mahowald

Mentor's Department

Speech, Hearing, and Rehabilitation Services

Mentor's College

Allied Health and Nursing

Description

Camp Maverick is a day camp that includes recreational and literacy activities to help improve a child’s literacy skills. Given circumstances, Camp Maverick was provided via teletherapy sessions. The aim of our research was to gather information on the child/caregiver’s perception of effectiveness for literacy sessions via teletherapy compared to face-to-face. An anonymous survey was provided to both the child and caregiver, although optional, was highly encouraged. Participants were asked to rate their experience on an ordinal scale, describe their experience, and whether they preferred face-to-face therapy or teletherapy for sessions. Results indicated that children and caregivers liked teletherapy for its convenience, however, preferred face-to-face-therapy for building a connection between the child and therapist. Limitations that could have affected the outcome of the research included children misunderstanding questions and the lack of survey responses. The significance of this study provides insight as to the effectiveness of teletherapy versus face-to-face therapy for Camp Maverick participants.

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Apr 15th, 3:30 PM Apr 15th, 3:45 PM

Teletherapy and Camp Maverick: Literacy Students and Caregiver's Perspectives

Camp Maverick is a day camp that includes recreational and literacy activities to help improve a child’s literacy skills. Given circumstances, Camp Maverick was provided via teletherapy sessions. The aim of our research was to gather information on the child/caregiver’s perception of effectiveness for literacy sessions via teletherapy compared to face-to-face. An anonymous survey was provided to both the child and caregiver, although optional, was highly encouraged. Participants were asked to rate their experience on an ordinal scale, describe their experience, and whether they preferred face-to-face therapy or teletherapy for sessions. Results indicated that children and caregivers liked teletherapy for its convenience, however, preferred face-to-face-therapy for building a connection between the child and therapist. Limitations that could have affected the outcome of the research included children misunderstanding questions and the lack of survey responses. The significance of this study provides insight as to the effectiveness of teletherapy versus face-to-face therapy for Camp Maverick participants.