Event Title

Evaluating Platinum-Based Compounds in Glioblastoma Cells

Location

CSU 255

Start Date

12-4-2022 1:30 PM

End Date

4-2022 2:30 PM

Student's Major

Biochemistry

Student's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Mentor's Name

Samantha Katner

Mentor's Department

Biochemistry

Mentor's College

Science, Engineering and Technology

Description

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common, malignant, and aggressive brain tumor making up 16% of all primary central nervous system cancers with an incidence rate of 3.2 people per 100,000 population. GBM is a disease that is characterized by rapid growth and invasion and has a median survival rate of 7-15 months with less than 5% of patients living longer than five years from the time of diagnosis. The current standards of treatment for GBM consist of surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, however, the disease still has a poor prognosis despite these treatments due to its intra-tumoral molecular heterogeneity and the blood-brain barrier. These obstacles call for molecular targeted therapeutic agents in battling GBM. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) which are usually found on the surfaces of many cell types and modulate the activity of multiple signaling pathways and cell-microenvironment interactions have been shown to regulate multiple oncogenic pathways in GBM. Specifically, glypican-1 (GPC1) and glypican 3 (GPC3) which are heparan sulfate proteoglycans that are abundant in GBM and have been shown to play a significant role in the mitogenic pathway of gliomas, making them attractive therapeutic targets. Recently, we created double knock-outs of GPC1 and GPC3 using CRISPR in GBM cells. We were able to assess cell viability and evaluate the effects of platinum-based compounds by quantification of the number of live cells from their metabolic activity in a XTT assay. Here, we conducted drug studies to determine the difference in response between the wild type and GPC1/3 absent cells.

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Apr 12th, 1:30 PM Apr 1st, 2:30 PM

Evaluating Platinum-Based Compounds in Glioblastoma Cells

CSU 255

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common, malignant, and aggressive brain tumor making up 16% of all primary central nervous system cancers with an incidence rate of 3.2 people per 100,000 population. GBM is a disease that is characterized by rapid growth and invasion and has a median survival rate of 7-15 months with less than 5% of patients living longer than five years from the time of diagnosis. The current standards of treatment for GBM consist of surgical resection followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy, however, the disease still has a poor prognosis despite these treatments due to its intra-tumoral molecular heterogeneity and the blood-brain barrier. These obstacles call for molecular targeted therapeutic agents in battling GBM. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) which are usually found on the surfaces of many cell types and modulate the activity of multiple signaling pathways and cell-microenvironment interactions have been shown to regulate multiple oncogenic pathways in GBM. Specifically, glypican-1 (GPC1) and glypican 3 (GPC3) which are heparan sulfate proteoglycans that are abundant in GBM and have been shown to play a significant role in the mitogenic pathway of gliomas, making them attractive therapeutic targets. Recently, we created double knock-outs of GPC1 and GPC3 using CRISPR in GBM cells. We were able to assess cell viability and evaluate the effects of platinum-based compounds by quantification of the number of live cells from their metabolic activity in a XTT assay. Here, we conducted drug studies to determine the difference in response between the wild type and GPC1/3 absent cells.

Recommended Citation

Kimmet, Jordan and Morgan Rud. "Evaluating Platinum-Based Compounds in Glioblastoma Cells." Undergraduate Research Symposium, Mankato, MN, April 12, 2022.
https://cornerstone.lib.mnsu.edu/urs/2022/oral-session-04/2